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Summer 2017

More to the Story: Former Impact chairmen add to article about 1967 Symposium

Sep. 25, 2017—As the chairmen of the first five Impact sym­posia, we are delighted when articles about this important and unique Vanderbilt institution are published, most recently the “Speak Up” article written by Andrew Maraniss in the Spring 2017 issue.

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Mogul in the Making: Charles D. King’s entertainment career is turning out just the way he scripted it

Sep. 7, 2017—In 2015, King started MACRO, a media company focused on developing content for multicultural audiences. The company’s first major project was the movie Fences, directed by Denzel Washington and nominated for four Oscars last year.

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Let There Be Light: Paris’ first police chief exposes the unholy work afoot in the ‘crime capital of the world’

Sep. 7, 2017—in the latest book by Vanderbilt Professor of French Holly Tucker—City of Light, City of Poison: Murder, Magic, and the First Police Chief of Paris (2017, Norton)—she recounts the true-crime saga of a string of murders that plagued Paris in the late 1600s—and how the city’s first police chief stopped them.

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The Writing That Binds: Two decades after a botched interview, two college friends reconnect

Sep. 7, 2017—By Bryant Palmer, BA’95   It’s 1994, and I’m in the offices of the Vanderbilt Hustler at 10 a.m. on a Wednesday. I spend as much time here as anywhere else on campus, but not usually this early. I’ve got a phone interview, not with a dean about another news story, but with James Dickey,...

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Brainiac: With her innovative ‘brain soup,’ Suzana Herculano-Houzel is changing neuroscience one species at a time

Sep. 7, 2017—When she finally applied her "brain soup" technique to the human brain, Herculano-Houzel discovered we have an average of 86 billion neurons. Surprisingly, though, the neuron density is the same as in other primates, showing a clear evolutionary pattern from monkeys to humans. “We somehow manage to have this large brain with a large number of neurons; but it’s still just a regular primate brain,” says Herculano-Houzel.

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Artist and activist: Mel Chin named Peabody College Distinguished Alumnus

Sep. 7, 2017—Visionary artist Mel Chin, BA’75, was honored during Commencement May 12 by Vanderbilt’s Peabody College of education and human development with the 2017 Distinguished Alumnus Award. Born in Houston in 1951 and reared in the African American and Latino neighborhood known as the Fifth Ward, Chin graduated from Peabody with an art degree in 1975....

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Accolades

Sep. 7, 2017—Mark L. Schoenfield, professor of English, is among 173 scholars, artists and scientists in the United States and Canada to be awarded a 2017 John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship. Assistant Professor of Cinema and Media Arts Jonathan Rattner’s film The Interior won the Michael Moore Award for Best Documentary at the 2017 Ann Arbor...

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Decadence and Dada: Vanderbilt celebrates acquisition of Paul Verlaine poetry collection

Sep. 7, 2017—Poet Paul Verlaine rocketed between emotional highs and lows, between a life of complete freedom of movement and morals (leaving his wife to wander Europe with poet Arthur Rimbaud) and one of incarceration (serving a prison sentence after an argument that ended with Verlaine shooting at Rimbaud). A major influence on the French symbolist poets,...

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Golden Reed: Berkenstock celebrates 50 years with Lyric Opera of Chicago

Sep. 7, 2017—Some people believe the life of a musician is nomadic, traveling the world and playing in all kinds of venues. However, James Berkenstock, BMus’64, who graduated with a music degree from Peabody College in 1964, is one who took root. At the end of June, he retired after 50 years playing bassoon with the Lyric...

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Schoolboy to Helldiver: A Vanderbilt student writes home about a future that would never come

Sep. 7, 2017—  When John Speier Manchester left Vanderbilt halfway through his sophomore year in December 1942 to enlist in the U.S. Navy, he was eager to make his name as a dashing World War II fighter pilot. A little more than a month after joining, the fresh-faced 19-year-old son of former Vanderbilt professor Paul T. Manchester,...

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Fire on Ice: Vanderbilt photographer captures Nashville Predators’ playoff run

Sep. 7, 2017—Like the rest of Nashville, Vanderbilt was bitten by the hockey bug as the city’s 20-year-old NHL expansion team, the Predators, battled the Pittsburgh Penguins in June for this year’s Stanley Cup. University photographer John Russell, who shot much of the action for the Nashville team (including the photo seen here), even helped enlist Vanderbilt’s mascot, Mr. C., to rally Preds fans in the final days of the championship series.

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History Lessons: Editor’s Letter, Summer 2017

Sep. 7, 2017—As the campus buzzes with the arrival of new students (and the university made sure they were outfitted with solar eclipse glasses), I think about the spectrum of history embodied in an institution like Vanderbilt. What school traditions or past stories will ignite the imaginations of these newest Commodores?

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