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Robert Webster

New VURC Subcommittee for International Research and Engagement formed

Nov. 18, 2019—Faculty have been named to a new subcommittee formed by the Vanderbilt University Research Council to provide governance for the GlobalVU initiative.

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Hand-held robot points to less invasive prostate surgery

Jul. 18, 2019—Vanderbilt collaborators focused on minimally invasive prostate surgery are developing an endoscopic robotic system with two-handed dexterity at a much smaller scale than existing options.

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Hand-held robot points to less invasive prostate surgery

Jul. 18, 2019—Vanderbilt collaborators focused on minimally invasive prostate surgery are developing an endoscopic robotic system with two-handed dexterity at a much smaller scale than existing options. A key part of the design – telescoping, curved, concentric tubes – received U.S. patent protection in March 2019, the same month the principal investigators secured a $2.1 million R01...

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Endowed chair holder celebration honors eight faculty members

Feb. 28, 2019—Vanderbilt’s newest endowed chair holders were celebrated for their path-breaking scholarship and research by family members, donors, colleagues and friends during a Feb. 25 ceremony.

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Team to develop steerable robotic needle for biopsies

Oct. 26, 2017—Collaboration between a mechanical engineer at Vanderbilt University and a pulmonologist at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) has resulted in a National Institutes of Health (NIH) R01 grant that will be used to develop a steerable robotic needle to safely biopsy hard-to-reach lung nodules.

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Team developing imaging upgrade for robotic surgery

Oct. 12, 2017—Removing part of a kidney with minimally invasive robotic surgery rather than an entire kidney when operating for smaller tumors is often best for patients from a recovery and health standpoint, but many surgeons hesitate to do so because of the complexity of the robotic partial nephrectomy procedure.

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How six cups of ground coffee can improve nose, throat surgery

Jun. 20, 2017—Vanderbilt engineers have designed a “granular jamming cap” filled with coffee grounds that can improve the accuracy of the sophisticated “GPS” system that surgeons use for nose and throat surgery.

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Tiny mechanical wrist gives new dexterity to needlescopic surgery

Jul. 23, 2015—VIDEO» A Vanderbilt research team has successfully created a mechanical wrist less than 1/16th of an inch thick -- small enough to use in needlescopic surgery, the smallest form of minimally invasive surgery.

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Brain surgery through the cheek

Oct. 15, 2014—Vanderbilt engineers have developed a surgical robot designed to perform brain surgery by entering through the cheek instead of the skull.

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Vanderbilt Medicine: Robotics revolution

Sep. 11, 2013—In the foreseeable future, robots will be sticking steerable needles in your brain to remove blood clots; capsule robots will be crawling up your colon as a painless replacement for the colonoscopy; and ultra-miniaturized snake robots will remove tumors from your bladder and other body cavities.

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Robot uses steerable needles to treat brain clots

Aug. 8, 2013—Surgery to relieve the damaging pressure caused by hemorrhaging in the brain is a perfect job for a robot. That is the basic premise of a new image-guided surgical system under development at Vanderbilt University.

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NSF grant accelerates development of medical capsule robots

Dec. 6, 2012—Four Vanderbilt School of Engineering faculty members have been awarded a $1 million grant from the National Science Foundation to create new tools, including a web-based modeling and simulation infrastructure, intended to help speed up the development of miniature medical capsule robots.

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