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archaeology

Space archaeologist and TED Prize winner to deliver University Course special lecture on Sept. 26

Sep. 6, 2019—Archaeologist and Egyptologist Sarah Parcak, whose work on using modern satellite imagery to study ancient civilizations has received worldwide acclaim, will speak at Vanderbilt on Sept. 26 as part of a special University Course guest lecture. The free lecture will take place at 5:30 p.m. in the Student Life Center Board of Trust Room.

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Digging up bones thanks to a competitive grant from National Geographic

Mar. 8, 2019—Maya Krause, a Ph.D. student specializing in bioarchaeology, will spend her summer high in the mountains of Peru searching for ancient human remains after earning National Geographic’s Early Career Grant.

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Scholar who pioneered Vanderbilt’s curriculum in classical antiquity dies

Jan. 30, 2019—A memorial service at Benton Chapel is planned Feb. 23 for Barbara Tsakirgis, professor of classical studies, emerita, who recently died.

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Wernke receives ACLS grant to develop a digital platform for virtual archaeological survey in the Andes

May. 24, 2018—The $150,000 digital extension grant from the American Council of Learned Societies funds the development of a digital platform that promises to greatly expand our understanding of Andean culture.

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Northern coast of Peru was a hospitable rest stop for early Americans

May. 24, 2017—Vanderbilt researchers found a place where early Americans paused on their migrations south and "settled in for a good long while," suggesting a slower pace of settlement than originally believed.

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Museum dedicated to Vanderbilt archaeologist’s work to be built in Chile

Mar. 23, 2017—Tom Dillehay's discoveries at Monte Verde in southern Chile revolutionized the understanding of how and when the Americas were first peopled.

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Vanderbilt excavation begins to shed more light on the lives of early Peruvians

Oct. 4, 2016—Findings from archaeologist Tom Dillehay's dig at Huaca Prieta and Paredones include the world's earliest known use of indigo dye.

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Anthropology celebrates year of big wins for graduate students

May. 25, 2016—Five Ph.D. students affiliated with the Department of Anthropology have landed significant grants this year, continuing a long trend of successes for the small department.

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Anthropology Ph.D. student wins prestigious scholarship for Native Americans

Apr. 18, 2016—Antonio Villaseñor-Marchal, a first-year Ph.D. student in the Department of Anthropology, has won this year’s Native American Graduate Archaeology Scholarship from the Society of American Archaeology.

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Our favorite #vandygram photos of the week

Apr. 3, 2016—On April 1, news of "Vanderbilt's biggest discovery yet" was shared on social media; this image from the Alumni Lawn dig site is one our favorite #vandygram photos of the week.

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Special-edition beer inspired partly by Vanderbilt archaeology debuts in Chicago

Feb. 24, 2016—A corn-and-pepper beer whose significance to an ancient South American empire was confirmed by archaeologist Tiffiny Tung has inspired a custom brew commissioned by Chicago's Field Museum.

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Eberl receives grant to study the cultural identity of Q’eqchi’ Maya

Feb. 23, 2016—Markus Eberl will study how the relocation of a Maya community in Guatemala affects their connection to the past.

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