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archaeology Archives

Wernke receives ACLS grant to develop a digital platform for virtual archaeological survey in the Andes

May. 24, 2018—The $150,000 digital extension grant from the American Council of Learned Societies funds the development of a digital platform that promises to greatly expand our understanding of Andean culture.

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Northern coast of Peru was a hospitable rest stop for early Americans

May. 24, 2017—Vanderbilt researchers found a place where early Americans paused on their migrations south and "settled in for a good long while," suggesting a slower pace of settlement than originally believed.

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Museum dedicated to Vanderbilt archaeologist’s work to be built in Chile

Mar. 23, 2017—Tom Dillehay's discoveries at Monte Verde in southern Chile revolutionized the understanding of how and when the Americas were first peopled.

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Vanderbilt excavation begins to shed more light on the lives of early Peruvians

Oct. 4, 2016—Findings from archaeologist Tom Dillehay's dig at Huaca Prieta and Paredones include the world's earliest known use of indigo dye.

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Anthropology celebrates year of big wins for graduate students

May. 25, 2016—Five Ph.D. students affiliated with the Department of Anthropology have landed significant grants this year, continuing a long trend of successes for the small department.

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Anthropology Ph.D. student wins prestigious scholarship for Native Americans

Apr. 18, 2016—Antonio Villaseñor-Marchal, a first-year Ph.D. student in the Department of Anthropology, has won this year’s Native American Graduate Archaeology Scholarship from the Society of American Archaeology.

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Our favorite #vandygram photos of the week

Apr. 3, 2016—On April 1, news of "Vanderbilt's biggest discovery yet" was shared on social media; this image from the Alumni Lawn dig site is one our favorite #vandygram photos of the week.

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Special-edition beer inspired partly by Vanderbilt archaeology debuts in Chicago

Feb. 24, 2016—A corn-and-pepper beer whose significance to an ancient South American empire was confirmed by archaeologist Tiffiny Tung has inspired a custom brew commissioned by Chicago's Field Museum.

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Eberl receives grant to study the cultural identity of Q’eqchi’ Maya

Feb. 23, 2016—Markus Eberl will study how the relocation of a Maya community in Guatemala affects their connection to the past.

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New clues emerge about the earliest known Americans

Nov. 18, 2015—Stone tools, cooked animal and plant remains, and fire pits found in Southern Chile provide greater evidence that a nomadic people adapted to a harsh ice-age environment--the first known Americans--reached South America more than 15,000 years ago.

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Vanderbilt Students Digging Into The Past

Nov. 2, 2015—Vanderbilt students are stepping back in time by digging in the dirt and getting class credit for it. They are doing an archaeological dig behind an on-campus 1870’s home of a Vanderbilt University professor and his family. Students are searching in the dirt to find items from the servants who lived in the smaller building...

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Vanderbilt archaeology students unearth university’s earliest history

Nov. 2, 2015—A project excavating early servants’ quarters is capturing clues about Vanderbilt lives that would otherwise be forgotten.

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