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Health and Medicine

New PET/CT scanner set to expand research opportunities

Jun. 7, 2018—A research-dedicated PET/CT scanner installed recently in the Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science (VUIIS) will expand opportunities for Vanderbilt researchers to conduct studies of a wide range of disorders, from cancer to Alzheimer’s disease.

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VU BreakThru: Leveraging quality improvement efforts to increase HPV vaccination rates in Tennessee

May. 31, 2018—Although HPV vaccination in adolescence can successfully prevent six kinds of cancer, rates in Tennessee remain relatively low, while occurrence of these cancers remains relatively high compared to the rest of the country.  Pamela Hull, assistant professor of medicine, and her colleagues are conducting a study funded by the HPV ACTIVE TIPs award, in collaboration with the Cumberland Pediatric Foundation, to test a model for disseminating a web-based quality improvement coaching program to pediatric clinics.

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Research reveals underappreciated role of brainstem in epilepsy

May. 31, 2018—New research from Vanderbilt suggests that repeated seizures reduce brainstem connectivity, a possible contributor to unexplained neurocognitive problems in epilepsy patients.

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Team seeks to shed light on rare immune-mediated adverse drug reaction

May. 31, 2018—Thirty years ago when she was 16, Katie Niemeyer was prescribed carbamazepine for depression. Three weeks later she was in a St. Louis, Missouri, burn unit with second and third degree burns all over her body. “My parents were told the chances of me surviving were slim,” she said.

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New research finds lung cancer risk drops substantially within five years of quitting smoking

May. 29, 2018—Just because you stopped smoking years ago doesn’t mean you’re out of the woods when it comes to developing lung cancer.  That’s the “bad” news. The good news is your risk of lung cancer drops substantially within five years of quitting.

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New method to thwart false positives in CT-lung cancer screening

May. 24, 2018—A team of investigators led by Fabien Maldonado, MD, associate professor of Medicine at Vanderbilt, and Tobias Peikert, MD, assistant professor of Medicine at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, has identified a new technology to address false positives in CT-based lung cancer screening. The study was published in the latest issue of PLOS One.

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Evolution of a deadly virus

May. 23, 2018—Genomic sequences have revealed that Florida is a major source of a mosquito-borne virus that causes disease in horses and humans.

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New target to stop Ebola

May. 21, 2018—A new Vanderbilt study suggests it may be possible to develop antibody therapies or a universal vaccine effective against multiple Ebola virus family members.

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Shaping reward circuits

May. 18, 2018—Using techniques to control and monitor the activities of individual neurons, Vanderbilt investigators are probing the brain’s reward circuitry.

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Alphavirus “Achilles heel”

May. 17, 2018—Targeting the protein that mosquito-borne viruses use to enter cells could be a strategy for preventing infection by multiple emerging viruses.

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Study finds sharp rise in suicide risk for children

May. 17, 2018—The number of school-age children and adolescents hospitalized for suicidal thoughts or attempts has more than doubled since 2008, according to a new Vanderbilt-led study published in Pediatrics.

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Early discharge of NAS infants prolongs treatment

May. 17, 2018—Infants who are diagnosed with drug withdrawal after birth who are treated with medication as outpatients at home are treated three times longer than infants treated solely as inpatients, according to a new Vanderbilt study.

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