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Health and Medicine

AIDS-defining events increase mortality risk: study

Feb. 8, 2018—When they occur among people living with HIV, certain cancers and opportunistic infections are considered by health authorities as AIDS-defining events, or ADEs.

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Study explores best pre-transplant weight loss options

Feb. 8, 2018—Vanderbilt researchers are comparing two types of weight-loss options to determine which is the most effective in helping obese patients reach a more ideal weight before undergoing kidney transplant surgery.

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Flu Fighter: Dr. James Crowe is leading a global effort to take the guesswork out of the flu shot

Feb. 6, 2018—From Vanderbilt Magazine: James Crowe, director of the Vanderbilt Vaccine Center, hopes to create a universal flu vaccine--permanently eliminating the problem of ineffective or under-effective annual flu shots.

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Study evaluates community-based health efforts

Feb. 1, 2018—A new study from researchers at Vanderbilt and Harvard universities, published this week in the journal Health Affairs, uses federal health survey data to evaluate community-based efforts to address smoking, obesity and other health conditions such as type 2 diabetes and hypertension.

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AAAS, chemistry society honor Lindsley’s research contributions

Feb. 1, 2018—Craig Lindsley, PhD, co-director of the Vanderbilt Center for Neuroscience Drug Discovery (VCNDD), has been named a fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry and elected chair-elect of the Section of Pharmaceutical Sciences of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

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Study tracks therapy to slow idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

Feb. 1, 2018—Investigators in the Division of Allergy, Pulmonary and Critical Care have launched a pilot study to see if patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) can tolerate the addition of a commonly used antiviral drug to standard IPF treatments. The research team believes the drug may ultimately help slow progression of the chronic and progressive disease or reverse its course.

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Cell skeleton and the brush border

Jan. 31, 2018—Vanderbilt researchers have discovered a role for microtubules — part of the cellular “skeleton” — in organizing the unique sidedness of the epithelial cells that line organs like the intestines.

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Imaging features predict tumor grade

Jan. 29, 2018—Vanderbilt researchers have discovered imaging features associated with increased risk for aggressive meningiomas (tumors of the brain membranes) that could help guide surgical planning and patient counseling.

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Versatile C. difficile blocker

Jan. 26, 2018—New research reveals a unique mechanism of C. difficile toxin neutralization by a monoclonal antibody, suggesting new therapeutic approaches.

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A cataract-heart connection

Jan. 25, 2018—Studies of alpha-B crystallin in zebrafish could ultimately lead to improved treatment for cataracts and heart disease.

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Study tracks sodium-potassium pathway

Jan. 25, 2018—A six-member group of biomedical scientists from Europe and the United States, including Eric Delpire, PhD, MS, professor of Anesthesiology, has been awarded a $6 million grant to study the role of dietary potassium in hypertension.

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Study may point to new ways to reverse insulin resistance

Jan. 25, 2018—Researchers at Vanderbilt University have discovered how insulin crosses the capillary endothelium to exit blood vessels and stimulate skeletal muscle cells — a major finding that may lead to new ways to reverse insulin resistance, a hallmark of type 2 diabetes.

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