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Author: Liz Entman

‘Virtual archaeology’ gives scholars a bigger perspective on the past

Apr. 15, 2020—A pair of international, collaborative online platforms developed by Steven Werkne and colleagues are helping archaeologists get a big-picture view of the Inka Empire and the Spanish invasion of the Andean region of South America.

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Transgender Americans experience significant economic, health challenges: Study

Apr. 13, 2020—Transgender adults experience considerably greater economic hardship and worse health than cisgender adults, according to the first study to document the socioeconomic struggles of this population in the United States. 

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Vanderbilt Health Policy COVID-19 model finds evidence of flattening curve, recommends distancing policies continue

Apr. 10, 2020—Vanderbilt researchers find that social distancing policies have slowed the spread of COVID-19, but caution that continued distancing is needed to keep the rate of spread low, and that any future rollback of such policies must be contingent on widely available testing and contact tracing.

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Study aims to shield health workers from COVID-19 infection

Apr. 10, 2020—Vanderbilt University Medical Center is playing a key role in the HERO program, a national effort to establish a registry of U.S. health care workers and test whether the anti-malarial drug hydroxychloroquine will protect them, their patients and their families from COVID-19.

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Study launched to test hydroxychloroquine as treatment for COVID-19

Apr. 10, 2020—Vanderbilt University Medical Center is leading a clinical trial to understand if a well-known drug used for malaria and rheumatologic conditions is safe and effective in treating hospitalized adults with COVID-19.

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Virtual Gatherings: Zoom coffee hours help MHS students and faculty stay connected, consider current events

Apr. 9, 2020—Medicine, Health and Society's virtual Thursday coffee hours leverages the center’s academic focus on the social aspects of illness and health to help students process the impact of COVID-19 on the wider world—and to blow off steam with a short dance break, too.

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Vanderbilt geospatial researchers fill unmet need for real-time maps of COVID-19 spread in Tennessee, Peru

Apr. 7, 2020—Sometimes the best way to understand the impact of an epidemic is to see it with your own eyes. Vanderbilt geospatial researchers have stepped up to apply their mapping skills to the COVID-19 crisis.

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Vanderbilt, American Talent Initiative mark progress in expanding higher-education access

Feb. 21, 2020—Vanderbilt University’s efforts to improve access to higher education through its alliance with the American Talent Initiative is showing dividends as the initiative reports that it is on track to enroll 50,000 more lower-income students at top colleges and universities by the year 2025. An annual progress update was released by ATI on Feb. 19.

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How even school lunches can become a partisan issue

Feb. 17, 2020—Even a seemingly uncontroversial topic like school lunch nutrition can become politicized when the person advocating for it is a polarizing figure, finds political scientist Cindy Kam.

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Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, World Health Organization bring global project to improve health care through social science to Vanderbilt

Feb. 7, 2020—A $600,000 grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation  will fund a three-year project with the World Health Organization, led by anthropology professor Ted Fischer, to develop a new model for health care that incorporates the consideration of cultural attitudes and practices that affect health in the United States.

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‘Dialogic praxis’ enhances psychotherapeutic success for youth

Jan. 16, 2020—For young patients, therapy works best when they are encouraged to become co-experts in the search for answers, according to findings from a study in Brazil co-authored by Dominique Béhague.

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Post-9/11 wars may have killed twice as many Americans at home as in battle: Analysis

Dec. 17, 2019—An analysis by Kip Viscusi finds that the post-9/11 wars may have resulted in more than twice as many indirect deaths back home as were lost in battle, due to the diversion of war costs from the U.S. economy and the subsequent impact on the nation’s health.

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