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Author: Liz Entman

The momentum myth: Staggering primaries didn’t affect outcome of 2016 nominating contests

Jul. 29, 2019—During the 2016 primary season, voters didn't shift their preferences based on who was winning, according to an analysis of more than 325,000 tracking poll results.

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When legislatures can and can’t check executive powers

Jul. 29, 2019—The largest analysis of gubernatorial executive orders to date reveals important nuances that explain how and when legislatures can constrain executive power.

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Supreme Court term limits could lead to constitutional whiplash: Study

Jul. 19, 2019—A popular proposal to limit the term of Supreme Court justices to 18 years could introduce unprecedented instability into the constitutional doctrine on polarizing topics, according to Vanderbilt law scholars.

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Decline of U.S. auto industry linked to midcentury shift in production models

Jul. 18, 2019—A massive shift in production models by American automakers to limit the impact of labor unions may have unintentionally stifled innovation and led to the present decline of the U.S. auto industry, according to new research by Joshua Murray.

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Blow your diet? Admitting it to someone might help you do better next time.

Jun. 26, 2019—Disclosing a lapse in self control, like straying from a diet or spending too much on something frivolous, can help you do better next time if you truly feel guilty about it, but insincere confessions can actually make you more likely to slip up again.

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It’s not always dog-eat-dog: Sometimes not having enough makes us more generous

Jun. 18, 2019—In a recent TEDx Nashville talk, Vanderbilt marketing professor Kelly Goldsmith discussed how being a contestant on "Survivor" helped illustrate a novel finding in behavioral science: Sometimes not having enough actually makes you...nicer.

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Human rights treaties benefit the world’s most oppressed

Jun. 17, 2019—International human rights treaties really do work, and they work most effectively against the most repressive governments, argues political scientist Emily Hencken Ritter in a new book.

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Cardiac toxicity risk factors identified with relapsed multiple myeloma therapy

Jun. 14, 2019—More than half of patients with relapsed multiple myeloma treated with carfilzomib experienced cardiac issues during treatment, according to a multi-institutional study published June 12 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Think Treasuries are risk-free? Not so fast.

Jun. 6, 2019—Oversight of the Treasury market hasn't kept up with new technology, leaving these very safe investments unexpectedly vulnerable to major shocks, says Vanderbilt law professor Yesha Yadav in a new paper.

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Tennessee stands at a political crossroads: Vanderbilt Poll

Jun. 6, 2019—Despite opportunities for broad consensus, Tennessee’s long history of pragmatic politics could be affected by rising polarization along party lines, according to the most recent statewide Vanderbilt University Poll.

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Bartels elected to American Philosophical Society

Jun. 3, 2019—Larry Bartels, May Werthan Shayne Chair of Public Policy and Social Science and co-director of Vanderbilt’s Center for the Study of Democratic Institutions, has been elected as a member of the American Philosophical Society, the oldest learned society in the United States.

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Study details regulation of a multi-drug transporter

May. 30, 2019—Vanderbilt University researchers have discovered how a protein pump distinguishes between chemicals that it will expel from a cell and inhibitors that block its action. The new findings could guide the development of more efficient inhibitors to prevent cancer cell resistance to chemotherapy.

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