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VUMC-led network to focus on polygenic risk for common diseases

Jul. 1, 2020—With the aid of a $75 million, five-year grant renewal, the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics Network (eMERGE) will venture beyond its current focus on monogenic disease to scoring research participants relative risk for complex heritable diseases such as cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease and type 2 diabetes.

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Discovery of aggressive cancer cell types by Vanderbilt researchers made possible with machine learning techniques

Jun. 24, 2020—Rebecca Ihrie and Jonathan Irish are leading the development of machine learning applications for brain cancer research.

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A connection to schizophrenia

Jun. 23, 2020—The insula, a small region of the brain involved in diverse brain functions had widespread dysconnectivity in schizophrenia, Vanderbilt researchers found.

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Single mutation causes seizure disorder

Jun. 22, 2020—A single mutation in one gene can impair inhibitory signaling in the brain and cause multiple types of seizures and behavioral abnormalities.

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Probing DNA damage repair

Jun. 18, 2020—After discovering a new mechanism for DNA damage repair last year, Vanderbilt biochemists now provide direct evidence for how it works.

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Studying cells in reduced dimensions

Jun. 18, 2020—Vanderbilt cell biologists have developed an unbiased, quantitative framework for evaluating single-cell data.

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All of Us program launches cloud-based research platform

Jun. 18, 2020—On May 27, the All of Us Research Program launched the beta version of its cloud-based research platform, the Researcher Workbench.

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Robotic technology speeds arrhythmia gene classification

Jun. 12, 2020—Vanderbilt University Medical Center investigators have used high-throughput robotic technology to rapidly study and classify variations in a gene linked to heart rhythm disorders and cardiac conditions.

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Staph’s activation of blood clotting

Jun. 9, 2020—Staph bacteria may change the factor they use to activate blood clotting — to evade the immune response — a new study suggests.

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Protecting the injured kidney

Jun. 4, 2020—Leslie Gewin and colleagues have upended conventional dogma about Wnt/beta-catenin signaling in the kidney, finding that it protects against chronic kidney disease rather than promoting it.

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Potential new cancer target

Jun. 4, 2020—Vanderbilt researchers have discovered the involvement of a certain type of adenosine receptor in mediating signaling that supports tumor growth and metastasis.

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Probing innate immunity

May. 19, 2020—Manuel Ascano team validates an inhibitor of the cGAS-STING signaling pathway, which is important for cellular innate immunity against bacteria, viruses, and our own damaged DNA.

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