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Julia Velkovska

Vanderbilt physicists help find compelling evidence for small drops of perfect fluid

Dec. 10, 2018—PHENIX publishes new particle-flow measurements to support their case that tiny projectiles create specks of quark-gluon plasma.

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Primordial cosmic soup easier to create than previously thought

Oct. 3, 2017—In subatomic collisions, physicists have found the signature of primordial cosmic soup, from which all the stuff in the universe formed, at lower energies and in smaller volume than ever before.

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Chancellor presents top prizes, including new award for excellence in equity, diversity and inclusion research, at fall assembly

Aug. 25, 2016—Chancellor Nicholas S. Zeppos presented seven faculty research awards, including two new awards for efforts that advance understanding of diversity, at the Fall Faculty Assembly Aug. 25.

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World’s largest atom smashers create world’s smallest droplets

Oct. 2, 2015—Recent experiments at the world's largest atom smashers are producing liquid drops so small that they raise the question of how small a droplet can be and still remain a liquid.

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Greene and Velkovska named fellows of American Physical Society

Jan. 14, 2015—Victoria Greene and Julia Velkovska have been named fellows of the American Physical Society, an organization of physicists dedicated to advancing knowledge and growth in the field.

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World’s smallest droplets

May. 16, 2013—Scientists at the Large Hadron Collider, the world's most powerful particle accelerator, may have created the smallest drops of liquid made in the lab.

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Discovery of new sub-atomic particle a major leap forward

Jul. 6, 2012—Vandy physicists working on the Large Hadron Collider respond to the announcement that the collaboration has found a new subatomic particle that may be the long-sought Higgs boson.

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Fermilab Today: The consistency of quark soup

May. 16, 2012—Four Vanderbilt researchers collaborated with scientists from the University of Illinois-Chicago, University of Kansas and MIT to describe the consistency of an unusual fluid produced when atoms of lead are smashed in the Large Hadron Collider.

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