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Proposed college rating systems unfair to low-income, minority students?

by | Posted on Tuesday, Aug. 26, 2014 — 2:20 PM

The United States Capitol (iStockphoto)

Stella Flores will join research colleagues in a congressional briefing on the proposed college rating systems at the U.S. Capitol. (iStockphoto)

Watch a video of the proceedings on C-SPAN.

In an effort to address recent accountability and financial aid policy proposals in Washington that may be detrimental to low-income and minority students, a higher education research and policy briefing will take place Sept. 2 from 9 a.m. to noon. Stella Flores, associate professor at Vanderbilt University’s Peabody College of education and human development, will be a member of a panel of education researchers that will discuss recent research related to these issues.

Stella Flores

Stella Flores (Steve Green/Vanderbilt)

“Do Higher Ed Accountability Proposals Narrow Opportunity for Minority Students and Minority-Serving Institutions? What New Research Tells Us” will convene at the U.S. Capitol Visitors Center, Congressional Auditorium and Atrium.

Flores is lead investigator of a new study that sheds light on the role of pre-college factors on college completion at minority-serving Institutions and will discuss how racial gaps in college completion rates are associated with both the pre-college characteristics of students and the institutional characteristics of the colleges and universities they attend.

The briefing is open to congressional staff, policymakers, advocates, researchers and the press. It is hosted by The Civil Rights Project at UCLA. Moderating will be Gary Orfield, Distinguished Research Professor of Education, Law, Political Science and Urban Planning at UCLA and co-director of the CRP.

Additional panelists will include Marybeth Gasman (University of Pennsylvania), Sara Goldrick-Rab (University of Wisconsin–Madison), Sylvia Hurtado (UCLA), Nicholas Hillman (University of Wisconsin–Madison), Willie Kirkland (Dillard University) and Anne-Marie Nuñez (University of Texas-San Antonio).

This briefing is supported by The Ford Foundation. Additional support is provided by the Graduate School of Education at Penn State, The Center for MSIs, Wisconsin Hope Lab, the Center for Access, Equity, and Diversity at Vanderbilt University, UNCF, Excelencia in Education, and the American Council on Education/Center for Policy Research and Strategy.

Learn more.

Contact:
Joan Brasher, (615) 322-NEWS
joan.brasher@vanderbilt.edu


  • Tracy Novak

    These are college completion standards, not admissions standards. There are many reasons low-income and minority students are unable to complete college that have nothing to do with academic preparation and that more privileged students do not face. In fact, studies have found that low-achieving but high income students are just as likely to complete college as are high-achieving but low income students.

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