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Three researchers receive EAGER awards

Aug. 22, 2014—Three Vanderbilt researchers have received an award designed to better understand how complex behaviors emerge from brain activity.

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Fault trumps gruesome evidence when it comes to meting out punishment

Aug. 3, 2014—A new brain study has identified the brain mechanisms that underlie our judgment of how severely a person who has harmed another should be punished.

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Education and Psychology releases Research


Research is shaping the undergraduate experience

May. 6, 2014—According to a 2013 survey of graduating seniors, more than half did faculty-guided or independent research during their Vanderbilt careers. Read about five students for whom research has helped shape their undergraduate years.

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Electric “thinking cap” controls learning speed

Apr. 11, 2014—In a new study published in the Journal of Neuroscience, Vanderbilt psychologists Robert Reinhart, a Ph.D. candidate, and Geoffrey Woodman, assistant professor of psychology, show that it is possible to selectively manipulate our ability to learn through the application of a mild electrical current to the brain, and that this effect can be enhanced or...

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Graduate students compete to present the best “Three Minute Thesis”

Apr. 9, 2014—Brain symmetry, woman warriors and malaria were among the research topics featured by the winners of the second annual Three Minute Thesis competition

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Dugan named to lead Division of Geriatric Medicine

Apr. 3, 2014—Laura Dugan, M.D., the Larry L. Hillblom Chair in Geriatric Medicine at the University of California San Diego (UCSD), will join the Vanderbilt faculty on April 7 to direct Vanderbilt University’s Division of Geriatric Medicine, a division of the Department of Medicine.

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Electric “thinking cap” controls learning speed

Mar. 21, 2014—Vanderbilt psychologists show it is possible to selectively manipulate our ability to learn through the application of a mild electrical current to the brain, and that this effect can be enhanced or depressed depending on the direction of the current.

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Education and Psychology releases Research


Brain mapping confirms patients with schizophrenia have impaired ability to imitate

Mar. 14, 2014—A brain-mapping study of patients with schizophrenia has found that areas associated with the ability to imitate are impaired, providing new support for the theory that deficits in this basic cognitive skill may underlie the profound difficulty with social interactions that characterize the disorder.

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Education and Psychology releases Research


In the brain, the number of neurons in a network may not matter

Feb. 3, 2014—A study has found that the time it takes neural networks in the brain to make decisions is remarkably stable regardless of size: a finding that could make it easier to achieve the goal of the President's BRAIN Initiative established last spring.

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Life, Earth and Space Research


Jon Kaas wins major neuroscience award

Nov. 14, 2013—Jon Kaas is the 2014 recipient of the George A. Miller Prize in Cognitive Neuroscience, which recognizes individuals whose research has had a revolutionary impact on the field.

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Education and Psychology myVU myVU Take Note releases Research


Universitywide limited submission opportunity: Rita Allen Foundation Scholars Award

Nov. 1, 2013—Vanderbilt University may nominate one candidate for the Rita Allen Foundation Scholars Award Program for 2014. This award provides $550,000 over five years for young investigators involved in research in the cure and treatment of diseases in the fields of cancer, immunology, and neuroscience.

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Finding the place where the brain creates illusory shapes and surfaces

Sep. 30, 2013—Neuroscientists have identified the location in the brain's visual cortex responsible for generating a common perceptual illusion: seeing shapes and surfaces that don't really exist when viewing a fragmented background.

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Life, Earth and Space releases Research


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