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Playlist Politics: Students create ways to engage apathetic, angry voters

Mar. 2, 2020—Two Vanderbilt seniors are taking unique approaches to bringing apathetic and frustrated voters to the political table.

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Vanderbilt archaeologists discover important medieval and Roman artifacts in ancient port city of Caesarea

Dec. 16, 2019—Vanderbilt archaeologists have uncovered clues to everyday life in the medieval Near East, as well as the best-preserved remains found to date of Herod’s Temple of Rome and Augustus, at the site of what was once a bustling port city on the Mediterranean.

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‘Tis the season to be stressed (and why you don’t have to be)

Dec. 12, 2019—The holidays can be stressful - between wrapping presents, overeating, reflecting on the past year, and shopping for presents - there is a lot to deal with. But many of these common issues can be explained (and combated) with science. Read what our Vanderbilt researchers have to say about these common holiday stressors.

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What leads to compulsive alcohol use? With new experiments into binge drinking, researchers are finally getting answers

Nov. 22, 2019—New study from neuroscientists at Vanderbilt provides initial answers to long-standing scientific questions on what causes the transition from moderate to compulsive alcohol consumption – and what makes some drinkers particularly vulnerable to developing alcohol use disorders.

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Here’s how a Vanderbilt astrophysicist plans to observe a black hole ‘symphony’ using gravitational wave astronomy

Nov. 18, 2019—New research led by Vanderbilt astrophysicist Karan Jani presents a compelling roadmap for capturing intermediate-mass black hole activity.

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Partisan attacks on class actions unfounded: Vanderbilt law scholar

Oct. 29, 2019—In a new book, Vanderbilt law professor Brian Fitzpatrick argues for an approach to class action lawsuits that both sides of the aisle can agree on.

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Food fight: How a community in Mexico used food to resist the Aztec empire

Oct. 1, 2019—Inspired by an ancient people’s use of food to resist defeat, anthropologist Keitlyn Alcantara now uses food to resist cultural loss among Latin American middle schoolers in Nashville.

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High standards of female songbirds could be driving their mates to evolve

Sep. 4, 2019—Picky females force male songbirds to become better singers.

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Public options can strengthen society: Vanderbilt law professor

Sep. 3, 2019—Robust public options for retirement, banking, child care and other broadly beneficial services – beyond health care – would position more Americans to participate equally in society, argues Vanderbilt law professor Ganesh Sitaraman in a new book.

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How peer pressure does—and doesn’t—influence our choices

Aug. 27, 2019—New research by marketing professor Kelly Haws helps explain why we match our friends' orders at a restaurant—but not exactly.

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Intense look at La Brea Tar Pits explains why we have coyotes, not saber-toothed cats

Aug. 5, 2019—The most detailed study to date of ancient predators trapped in the La Brea Tar Pits is helping Americans understand why today we’re dealing with coyotes dumping over garbage cans and not saber-toothed cats ripping our arms off.

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The momentum myth: Staggering primaries didn’t affect outcome of 2016 nominating contests

Jul. 29, 2019—During the 2016 primary season, voters didn't shift their preferences based on who was winning, according to an analysis of more than 325,000 tracking poll results.

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