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Patrick Abbot

They call it puppy love, but what is it really?

Feb. 12, 2019—Even if animals have ulterior motives for teaming up, they teach humans a lot about love, says Vanderbilt University animal biologist Patrick Abbot.

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Abbot’s new book is ‘one-stop destination’ on animal social evolution

Jun. 8, 2018—Patrick Abbot, associate professor of biological sciences, recently published an edited volume entitled "Comparative Social Evolution," an updated companion book to E.O. Wilson’s famous 1975 tome.

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‘Young Scientist’ showcases high schoolers’ research at Vanderbilt

Jun. 2, 2016—High school students performing advanced research at Vanderbilt have the opportunity to share their findings with the scientific community through a journal of their own.

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New online tool created to tackle complications of pregnancy and childbirth

Nov. 11, 2015—An interdisciplinary team of biologists and medical researchers have created a new platform, which they call GEneSTATION specifically designed to leverage the growing knowledge of human genomics and evolution to advance scientific understanding of human pregnancy and translate it into new treatments for the problems that occur when this complex process goes awry.

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Kudos: Read about faculty and staff awards and achievements

Jan. 10, 2014—Read about faculty and staff awards and achievements in the latest edition of "Kudos."

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College of Arts and Science 2013 Undergraduate Teaching Awards announced

Oct. 24, 2013—The College of Arts and Science recognized six faculty members with excellence in teaching and advising awards at its September faculty meeting.

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Cell phone bee mortality link: sensationalism not science

Jun. 14, 2011—Vanderbilt graduate student Cassidy Cobbs has investigated recent news reports linking cell phone emissions with bee mortality and found that there is no scientific basis for the claims.

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Bad buzz about blue-eyed cicadas

Jun. 2, 2011—Have you heard the latest buzz going round that scientists at Vanderbilt are paying as much as $3,000 for specimens of the rare blue-eyed cicada? If you have, I hope you haven’t spent a lot of time checking out cicadas’ eye color, because it is a hoax.  Most cicadas have red eyes, but a very...

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What scientists know about cicadas

May. 19, 2011—Periodic cicadas, like those currently emerging in Middle Tennessee, play an important role in the local ecosystem.

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