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Northern coast of Peru was a hospitable rest stop for early Americans

May. 24, 2017—Vanderbilt researchers found a place where early Americans paused on their migrations south and "settled in for a good long while," suggesting a slower pace of settlement than originally believed.

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14 in engineering, A&S, Peabody earn NSF Graduate Research Fellowships

May. 4, 2017—The National Science Foundation recently selected 14 Vanderbilt graduate students in fields as diverse as mechanical engineering and psychology to receive Graduate Research Fellowships. The fellowships are highly sought-after because they provide students with $34,000 annually for three years and the freedom to conduct their research at any accredited U.S. university.

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The tale teeth tell about the legendary man-eating lions of Tsavo

Apr. 19, 2017—Analysis of the microscopic wear on the teeth of three man-eating lions reveals that painful dental disease may have been what drove the cats to hunt humans instead of larger prey.

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New method for tapping vast plant pharmacopeia to make more effective drugs

Apr. 14, 2017—Geneticists have developed an effective new method for identifying the genes that produce the chemicals plants use to protect themselves from predators, which are an important natural drug source.

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A new mode of DNA repair

Apr. 14, 2017—Structural details of a protein that removes DNA lesions shed light on fundamental mechanisms of DNA repair.

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Organ-on-a-chip mimics heart’s biomechanical properties

Feb. 22, 2017—Scientists at Vanderbilt University have created a three-dimensional organ-on-a-chip that can mimic the heart’s amazing biomechanical properties in order to study cardiac disease, develop heart drugs.

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Climate change helped kill off super-sized Ice Age animals in Australia

Jan. 26, 2017—A new study has compared the diet of a variety of Australian megafaunal herbivores from the period when they were widespread (350,000 to 570,000 years ago) to a period when they were in decline (30,000 to 40,000 years ago) by studying their fossil teeth. The analysis suggests that climate change had a significant impact on their diets and may well have been a primary factor in their extinction.

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Softening tumor tissue could aid cancer treatments

Jan. 16, 2017—Tumors cause the intracellular material surrounding them to stiffen. Softening this protective layer could make existing cancer treatments more effective, according to new research.

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Access to health care strengthens communities: Vanderbilt study

Jan. 16, 2017—A new study shows that access to health insurance can help hold a community together socially, and lack of it can contribute to the fraying of neighborhood cohesion. The study, Beyond Health Effects? Examining the Social Consequences of Community Levels of Uninsurance Pre-ACA, published by the Journal of Health and Social Behavior, is an effort...

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Early math knowledge related to later achievement

Dec. 6, 2016—Findings will inform educators and school administrators developing curricula for the early years.

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Targeting the “un-targetable”

Nov. 18, 2016—A novel drug that targets the protein RSK blocked aggressive breast cancers from metastasizing in an animal model.

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Finally, a type of face that men recognize better than women

Nov. 16, 2016—A study finds men are better at recognizing Transformer faces while women are better at recognizing Barbie faces, supporting the theory that we're more likely to recognize what we're used to seeing.

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