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neurolaw Archives

Law, neuroscience student earns NIJ fellowship

Dec. 6, 2017—A student from the nation’s first joint law and neuroscience J.D. and Ph.D. program, housed at Vanderbilt University, has earned a $50,000 graduate research fellowship from the National Institute of Justice.

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Neuroscientists can measure criminal intent – at least in the moment

Mar. 13, 2017—Intent to commit a crime is a crucial factor in determining prison sentences. A new neuro study suggests it is possible to measure subtle variations in intent while a crime is being committed.

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How your brain decides blame and punishment—and how it can be changed

Sep. 16, 2015—New work by researchers at Vanderbilt University and Harvard University confirms that a specific area of the brain, the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, is crucial to punishment decisions.

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Landmark book ‘Law and Neuroscience’ released

Sep. 5, 2014—The new book 'Law and Neuroscience' is the definitive reference book on the use of neuroscientific evidence in courtrooms.

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Two Vanderbilt professors part of PBS series ‘Brains on Trial’ Sept. 11 and 18

Sep. 5, 2013—Research conducted at Vanderbilt is featured in "Brains on Trial with Alan Alda," a two-part televised series airing Sept. 11 and Sept. 18 on PBS that explores how the growing ability to separate truth from lies may radically affect the way criminal trials are conducted in the future.

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Crime and punishment: the neurobiological roots of modern justice

Apr. 18, 2012—Neuroscientists from Vanderbilt and Harvard have proposed the first neurobiological model for third-party punishment, outlining potential cognitive and brain processes that evolutionary pressures could have re-purposed to make this behavior possible.

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