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political science

Playlist Politics: Students create ways to engage apathetic, angry voters

Mar. 2, 2020—Two Vanderbilt seniors are taking unique approaches to bringing apathetic and frustrated voters to the political table.

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How even school lunches can become a partisan issue

Feb. 17, 2020—Even a seemingly uncontroversial topic like school lunch nutrition can become politicized when the person advocating for it is a polarizing figure, finds political scientist Cindy Kam.

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Vanderbilt Poll finds Tennesseans broadly united on key issues, economic insecurity top of mind for many

Dec. 17, 2019—The 2019 Vanderbilt Poll shows that Tennesseans agree on many tough issues, while a new set of questions reveals insights into the financial and health care worries of Tennessee voters.

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LAPOP receives $10 million USAID grant to support AmericasBarometer survey

Dec. 4, 2019—Vanderbilt’s Latin American Public Opinion Project has received a $10 million, five-year USAID grant to support its influential AmericasBarometer survey and related activities.

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New residential college named for Chancellor Emeritus Nicholas S. Zeppos

Nov. 11, 2019—Vanderbilt University is recognizing Chancellor Emeritus Nicholas S. Zeppos’ visionary leadership and legacy by naming one of its newest residential colleges in his honor. The Nicholas S. Zeppos College is slated to open in 2020.

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Chancellor’s Lecture to feature presidential historians Goodwin and Meacham

Oct. 14, 2019—“Lessons of Presidential Leadership” will be the focus of a conversation between presidential historians Doris Kearns Goodwin and Jon Meacham during a Chancellor’s Lecture Series event Oct. 31.

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Support for democracy in a slump across Americas, according to new survey

Oct. 14, 2019—Democracy is struggling for support in the Americas, according to the 2018/19 AmericasBarometer report, with just over half of all citizens expressing faith in the system for the second survey period in a row. “When citizen support for democracy is weak, it becomes difficult for nations to sustain free and fair political systems and leaves...

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New faculty John Sides: Interpreting politics’ impact on daily life

Sep. 29, 2019—How ordinary people think about political issues and make political decisions—especially at the ballot box—stands at the center of Professor of Political Science John Sides’ scholarship.

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Political scientist Kira Sanbonmatsu to deliver talk on women in Congress Oct. 3

Sep. 20, 2019—Political scientist Kira Sanbonmatsu will discuss “A Seat at the Table: Do Women in Congress Matter?” at 6 p.m. Oct. 3 at the John Seigenthaler First Amendment Center.

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The momentum myth: Staggering primaries didn’t affect outcome of 2016 nominating contests

Jul. 29, 2019—During the 2016 primary season, voters didn't shift their preferences based on who was winning, according to an analysis of more than 325,000 tracking poll results.

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When legislatures can and can’t check executive powers

Jul. 29, 2019—The largest analysis of gubernatorial executive orders to date reveals important nuances that explain how and when legislatures can constrain executive power.

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Human rights treaties benefit the world’s most oppressed

Jun. 17, 2019—International human rights treaties really do work, and they work most effectively against the most repressive governments, argues political scientist Emily Hencken Ritter in a new book.

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