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JAMA Archives

Sepsis trial ranked No. 1 on critical care website

Feb. 15, 2018—A clinical trial of an intervention for sepsis in patients in Zambia, led by Vanderbilt investigators, topped the list of 2017 trials featured by the website The Bottom Line.

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Study questions fees of medical specialty boards

Aug. 17, 2017—Physicians have been objecting to the high cost of the certification fees of the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) member boards for many years, and a research letter published recently by the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) shows that the revenue of these boards greatly exceeded expenditures in 2013.

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Study shows active surveillance preserves quality of life for prostate cancer patients

Mar. 21, 2017—Faced with the negative quality-of-life effects from surgery and radiation treatments for prostate cancer, low risk patients may instead want to consider active surveillance with their physician, according to a study released Tuesday by the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).

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Study shows opioids increase risk of death when compared to other pain treatments

Jun. 14, 2016—Long-acting opioids are associated with a significantly increased risk of death when compared with alternative medications for moderate-to-severe chronic pain, according to a Vanderbilt study released today in the Journal of the American Medical Assocation (JAMA).

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VUMC study finds statins do not ease kidney injury following cardiac surgery

Feb. 23, 2016—Among doctors, it is widely believed that a class of drugs called statins, which are used to lower cholesterol, might help patients tolerate the stress of cardiac surgery. Not so, according to a five-year, placebo-controlled, double-blinded randomized clinical trial conducted at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association....

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Vanderbilt study raises questions about reporting incidental genetic findings

Jan. 5, 2016—A genetic test that suggests a patient may be at increased risk for potentially fatal heart rhythms is very often not as ominous as it sounds.

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Access to specialists in ACA plans may be inadequate: study

Oct. 29, 2015—While 12 million Americans are enrolled in health care networks through the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) insurance marketplace, a recent study in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) raises concerns about patient access to specialists within these insurance plans.

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Guillamondegui: One standard needed to track concussions

Oct. 22, 2015—Data in sports concussion studies will continue to be disputed as long as the injuries are diagnosed by differing standards instead of universal guidelines, a Vanderbilt investigator concludes in a recent review.

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Depression intervention for at-risk youth shows sustained effects

Oct. 13, 2015—A new study finds that a cognitive-behavioral prevention program yielded sustained positive effects for youth at risk for depression.

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Flu vaccine helps reduce hospitalizations due to influenza pneumonia: study

Oct. 6, 2015—More than half of hospitalizations due to influenza pneumonia could be prevented by influenza vaccination, according to a study led by investigators at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, published this week in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Findings do not support chlorhexidine bathing in ICUs

Jan. 21, 2015—Vanderbilt University Medical Center researchers have found that bathing critically ill patients with disposable chlorhexidine cloths did not decrease the incidence of health care-associated infections when compared to less expensive nonantimicrobial cloths, according to a study appearing online in JAMA this week.

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More breast cancer patients opting for mastectomy, Vanderbilt study finds

Nov. 19, 2014—Far more breast cancer patients are choosing to undergo mastectomy, including removal of both breasts, instead of choosing breast conservation surgery even when they have early stage disease that is confined to one breast, a Vanderbilt study shows. In the past decade, there have also been marked trends toward higher proportions of women opting for...

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