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Alissa Weaver Archives

Celebration honors 11 new endowed chair holders

Dec. 5, 2017—Eleven Vanderbilt University faculty members named to endowed chairs were recognized for their outstanding scholarship and research during a celebration at the Student Life Center Nov. 29.

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myVU myVU News releases Research Research Blog


Nine Vanderbilt faculty members elected AAAS fellows

Nov. 25, 2016—Nine Vanderbilt University faculty members have been elected fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science this year.

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myVU myVU News releases Reporter Research Research Blog


An Argonaute’s voyage to cancer

Apr. 28, 2016—A genetic mutation that promotes cancer development blocks the normal sorting of a protein called “Argonaute 2.”

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Health and Medicine Reporter Research


Study explores less invasive way to monitor colorectal cancer

Feb. 18, 2016—Investigators at Vanderbilt University Medical Center have published research regarding an important feature of colorectal cancer (CRC) that could eventually lead to the development of non-invasive means of monitoring cancer progression. After lung cancer, CRC is the second-most lethal cancer in the United States.

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Healthcare Solutions Reporter


Sandberg, Weaver named to AAMC faculty council

Feb. 13, 2014—Vanderbilt University’s Warren Sandberg, M.D., Ph.D., and Alissa Weaver, M.D., Ph.D., have been appointed to three-year terms on the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) Council of Faculty and Academic Societies. The council is charged with identifying and communicating critical issues faced by medical school faculty members as they relate to the creation and implementation...

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Reporter


Cancer cells combine tools to increase invasiveness

Dec. 19, 2013—Two features of invasive cancer cells — invadopodia and exosomes — are linked together, Vanderbilt University investigators have discovered.

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Reporter


Proteins help flip tumor’s invasive switch

Oct. 4, 2012—Vanderbilt investigators have identified how two key components of cancer's invasive "switch" — the series of signaling events that turn on a tumor cell’s invasive behavior — work together.

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Health and Medicine Reporter Research