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Law, Business and Politics

Support for democracy in a slump across Americas, according to new survey

Oct. 14, 2019—Democracy is struggling for support in the Americas, according to the 2018/19 AmericasBarometer report, with just over half of all citizens expressing faith in the system for the second survey period in a row. “When citizen support for democracy is weak, it becomes difficult for nations to sustain free and fair political systems and leaves...

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Data breach fixes could impact patient care: Study

Oct. 7, 2019—IT security measures implemented following data breaches at hospitals may delay care when time is of the essence, according to a new analysis.

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Public options can strengthen society: Vanderbilt law professor

Sep. 3, 2019—Robust public options for retirement, banking, child care and other broadly beneficial services – beyond health care – would position more Americans to participate equally in society, argues Vanderbilt law professor Ganesh Sitaraman in a new book.

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How peer pressure does—and doesn’t—influence our choices

Aug. 27, 2019—New research by marketing professor Kelly Haws helps explain why we match our friends' orders at a restaurant—but not exactly.

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When it comes to investing, love at first sight doesn’t always pay off

Aug. 20, 2019—It's very easy to get too attached to a particular investment—even when there are better options out there. New research by Vanderbilt business professors explains why it happens, and how to avoid it.

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The momentum myth: Staggering primaries didn’t affect outcome of 2016 nominating contests

Jul. 29, 2019—During the 2016 primary season, voters didn't shift their preferences based on who was winning, according to an analysis of more than 325,000 tracking poll results.

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When legislatures can and can’t check executive powers

Jul. 29, 2019—The largest analysis of gubernatorial executive orders to date reveals important nuances that explain how and when legislatures can constrain executive power.

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Supreme Court term limits could lead to constitutional whiplash: Study

Jul. 19, 2019—A popular proposal to limit the term of Supreme Court justices to 18 years could introduce unprecedented instability into the constitutional doctrine on polarizing topics, according to Vanderbilt law scholars.

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Blow your diet? Admitting it to someone might help you do better next time.

Jun. 26, 2019—Disclosing a lapse in self control, like straying from a diet or spending too much on something frivolous, can help you do better next time if you truly feel guilty about it, but insincere confessions can actually make you more likely to slip up again.

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It’s not always dog-eat-dog: Sometimes not having enough makes us more generous

Jun. 18, 2019—In a recent TEDx Nashville talk, Vanderbilt marketing professor Kelly Goldsmith discussed how being a contestant on "Survivor" helped illustrate a novel finding in behavioral science: Sometimes not having enough actually makes you...nicer.

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Human rights treaties benefit the world’s most oppressed

Jun. 17, 2019—International human rights treaties really do work, and they work most effectively against the most repressive governments, argues political scientist Emily Hencken Ritter in a new book.

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Think Treasuries are risk-free? Not so fast.

Jun. 6, 2019—Oversight of the Treasury market hasn't kept up with new technology, leaving these very safe investments unexpectedly vulnerable to major shocks, says Vanderbilt law professor Yesha Yadav in a new paper.

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