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Vanderbilt to celebrate Black History Month with events throughout February

Feb. 1, 2021, 8:00 AM

The Bishop Joseph Johnson Black Cultural Center at Vanderbilt
The Bishop Joseph Johnson Black Cultural Center at Vanderbilt (John Russell/Vanderbilt)

Vanderbilt University’s annual celebration of Black History Month—a time to acknowledge and appreciate the history, experience and accomplishments of Black people on the Vanderbilt campus, across the country and globally—will kick off on Monday, Feb. 1, with a virtual program coordinated by the Bishop Joseph Johnson Black Cultural Center. Other events in the monthlong series will include presentations, panel discussions, play readings, yoga sessions and more, most to be held virtually.

The below events are open to all members of the Vanderbilt community. All times are CST. For more information, visit the Black Cultural Center website.

Feb. 1
1 p.m.
Virtual kickoff celebration

Join us for a brief virtual event kicking off Black History Month 2021. The informal program will feature remarks by Vice Chancellor for Equity, Diversity and Inclusion and Chief Diversity Officer André Churchwell, Bishop Joseph Johnson Black Cultural Center Director Rosevelt Noble and others, as well as music from Melanated A Cappella.

Register here. >>

Feb. 2
6 p.m.
Our History, Our Legacy: The Lost in the Ivy Project

Since 2007, Rosevelt Noble, director of the Black Cultural Center, assistant dean of residential colleges and senior lecturer in sociology, has worked on a research project documenting the history and experience of Black students at Vanderbilt. This talk will provide a brief overview of the project and discuss some of the upcoming results.

Register here. >>

Feb. 4
Noon
More Than Tired: The Lesser-told Story of Rosa Parks

In the mainstream story, Rosa Parks was a sweet old lady who, because she was tired one day, decided not to give up her seat on a Montgomery, Alabama, bus, sparking a movement. This brief presentation—taking place on Parks’ birthday—will focus on the untold story of her racial and social activist experience. Special prizes will be available for participants.

Register here. >>

Feb. 4
1 p.m.
Why Black America Should Get Vaccinated Against COVID-19 featuring Dr. James Hildreth, president of Meharry Medical College

Please join us for a 30-minute talk with Dr. James Hildreth, president and chief executive officer of Meharry Medical College, on “Why Black America Should get Vaccinated Against COVID-19.”

Register here. >>

Feb. 4
6 p.m.
Black History Month-themed yoga session with Jo-Jo

De-stress and relax in a one-hour yoga session with Jo-Jo Jackson. The sessions during Black History Month will feature different Black female leaders. Participants will qualify to receive free inspirational posters featuring each of the leaders.

Register here. >>

Feb. 5
Noon
Race, Faith and American Democracy: A Conversation with Cornel West and Victor Anderson

Prominent scholars Cornel West, professor of the practice of public philosophy at Harvard Divinity School, and Victor Anderson, Oberlin Theological School Chair and professor of ethics and society at Vanderbilt Divinity School, will participate in this conversation co-sponsored by Vanderbilt’s African American and Diaspora Studies and Callie House Research Center.

Participate using this link. >>

Feb. 8
4 p.m.
Staying the Course in Medicine: A Conversation with Your Peers

Applying to medical school can be daunting, but so can the entire pre-med journey. Join us for a discussion with a group of your peers who stayed the course despite setbacks. Get the opportunity to ask: What has been the secret to their success? How did they survive pre-med coursework? Did they get straight A’s? Were they ever discouraged? Join us not only to celebrate the success of this group of seven students who have accomplished so much, but also to learn about their experiences and hopefully gain encouragement for your own journey.

Register via Doreways: Events & Programs> Career Center Programs> Staying the Course in Medicine: A Conversation with Your Peers

Feb. 9
5 p.m.
Teaching Haiti with Music and Carnival

Join us for a K-12 teacher workshop featuring Danielle Dorvil, a graduate student in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese.

Register here. >>

Feb. 9
6:30 p.m.
The Bridge – Black religion showcase

This is an opportunity for students to connect with local faith communities. Participants are invited to engage with organizations that parallel where students are on their faith journey, learn what these religious communities have to offer, and get answers to questions they may have regarding future engagement.

Register here. >>

Feb. 10
12:10 p.m.
Translating Haiti: A Conversation with Nathan Dize and Vanessa Valdés

A conversation about Haiti featuring Nathan Dize, a graduate student in Vanderbilt’s Department of French and Italian, and Vanessa K. Valdés of The City College of New York–CUNY.

Register here. >>

Feb. 10
5 p.m.
RSJI Session 5: Saving Our Communities featuring Gideon’s Army

Session 5 of the BCC’s Racial and Social Justice Institute will focus on the efforts and initiatives led by Gideon’s Army to provide community support and resources for Black neighborhoods in Nashville. Join us for a powerful talk led by Rasheedat Fetuga, a Vanderbilt alumna and founder of Gideon’s Army.

Register here. >>

Feb. 11
12:30 p.m.
Race and Revolution panel discussion with Vanderbilt faculty members Brandon Byrd, Jane Landers, Jesus Ruiz and Tiffany Patterson

Meeting information here. >>

Feb. 11
6 p.m.
Black History Month-themed yoga session with Jo-Jo

De-stress and relax in a one-hour yoga session with Jo-Jo Jackson. The sessions during Black History Month will feature different Black female leaders. Participants will qualify to receive free inspirational posters featuring each of the leaders.

Register here. >>

Feb. 12
12:10 p.m.
Calculating the Sensory Aesthetics of Black Liberation featuring Stacey Robinson

More information to come.

Registration link to come.

Feb. 15
Noon
From Inclusion to Equity: The Story of Black Biomedical Scientists

The School of Medicine Basic Sciences will host a panel discussion about the historical discoveries and experiences of black biomedical scientists and their impact on the current generation of science and scientific leaders. The event will be moderated by Dr. André Churchwell, vice chancellor for equity, diversity and inclusion, chief diversity officer and professor of medicine.

Register here. >>

Feb. 16
7 p.m.
Murray Lecture: Who will Save American Democracy? The Role of Women, Young Voters and People of Color in American Politics

LaTosha Brown, co-founder of the Black Voters Matter Fund and fellow at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, will deliver a powerful talk on the influence of women, young voters and people of color in American politics.

Register here. >>

Feb. 17
5 p.m.
She Black, She Boss and She Vandy! – Session 1

This two-part series celebrates Black female alumni leaders from Vanderbilt who have started their own company, nonprofit, school, etc. Each part in the series will feature three to four guest participants from differing sectors. Come be inspired by Vanderbilt Black excellence.

Register here. >>

Feb. 18
6 p.m.
Black History Month-themed yoga session with Jo-Jo

De-stress and relax in a one-hour yoga session with Jo-Jo Jackson. The sessions during Black History Month will feature different Black female leaders. Participants will qualify to receive free inspirational posters featuring each of the leaders.

Register here. >>

Feb. 19
11 a.m.
Black Pioneers in the World of Sports and Their Relevance Today – Panel discussion

A panel of leading Black scholars and authors on the history of Black athletes and activism—including Lou Moore, Derrick White, Amira Rose Davis and Andrea Williams—will discuss the lessons learned from Black athlete activists of the past that are especially relevant today. Moore and White are professors and co-hosts of The Black Athlete podcast; Davis is a professor and co-host of the Burn It All Down podcast; and Williams is the author of a new biography on Effa Manley, a Negro Leagues team owner.

Presented by the Vanderbilt Sports and Society Initiative, the Bishop Joseph Johnson Black Cultural Center and the Vanderbilt Athletics Black and Gold Club.

Register here. >>

Feb. 19
12:10 p.m.
We Want Our Bodies Back featuring Jessica Care Moore

Moore is a renowned poet, recording artist and producer.

Registration link to come.

Feb. 22
1 p.m.
Career Explorations with the United States Public Health Service Black Commissioned Officers Advisory Group

Members of the U.S. Public Health Service Black Commissioned Officers Advisory Group will share information about their role with the service and what career paths are open to students at Vanderbilt.

Registration link to come.

Feb. 23
Ongoing – participate at your leisure
A Black Man Who Jogs: A socially distant run in remembrance of Ahmaud Arbery (#stillrunning)

Run at your leisure on Feb. 23, the one-year anniversary of the tragic death of Ahmaud Aubery. Document your run on social media. Participants will receive a free T-shirt.

Feb. 24
Noon
What’s Happening Wednesday: Ahmaud Aubery—One Year Later

From Ahmaud Arbery to the Black Lives Matter movement to the fight against social injustices, 2020 was a year of historical events. Join the Student Center for Social Justice and Identity and the Black Cultural Center for a discussion about the larger pattern of police brutality and misconduct and the impact of the Black Lives Matter movement in 2020.

Registration link to come.

Feb. 24
4:30 p.m.
LGBTQI Pride Training

Pride training aims to create a visible network of support for LGBTQ2S+ individuals and their allies by providing an avenue through which any member of the Vanderbilt community can show their support. (The training is approximately three hours and occurs two to three times per semester.)

Register here. >>

Feb. 24
5 p.m.
Mental Health and Black America Today: Where are We?

The Vanderbilt University School of Nursing Alumni Speaker Series will host a panel featuring six VUSN alumni who work in the psychiatric-mental health field, including Asa Briggs, Cerrissa Hugie, Tanya Sorrell, Anitra Ellerby-Brown, Carole Weddington Hunt and LeTizia Baxter Smith, who will serve as moderator.

Register here. >>

Feb. 24
7 p.m.
No Place Like Home: The Bishop Joseph Johnson Black Cultural Center

Rosevelt Noble, director of the Black Cultural Center, will deliver a presentation for the Vanderbilt community detailing the history, mission, structure, resources and initiatives of the center.

Register here. >>

Feb. 25
5 p.m.
She Black, She Boss and She Vandy! – Session 2

This two-part series celebrates Black female alumni leaders from Vanderbilt who have started their own company, nonprofit, school, etc. Each part in the series will feature three to four guest participants from differing sectors. Come be inspired by Vanderbilt Black excellence.

Register here. >>

Feb. 25
6 p.m.
Black History Month-themed yoga session with Jo-Jo

De-stress and relax in a one-hour yoga session with Jo-Jo Jackson. The sessions during Black History Month will feature different Black female leaders. Participants will qualify to receive free inspirational posters featuring each of the leaders.

Register here. >>

Feb. 26
12:10 p.m.
Reparations: An Issue Whose Time Has Come featuring Dr. Ron Daniels, president of the Institute of the Black World 21st Century

More information to come.

Registration link to come.

Feb. 26
1 p.m.
RSJI Session 6: Plugging in to Black Lives Matter—A Conversation with the Nashville Chapter of Black Lives Matter

Session 6 of the BCC’s Racial and Social Justice Institute will focus on the efforts and initiatives led by the Nashville chapter of the Black Lives Matter movement. Join us for a powerful discussion about their work in criminal justice reform, policing, politics and more. Come be inspired to get involved.

Register here. >>

In addition, Vanderbilt Divinity School will host Resilient Souls: We Rest Then We Rise, an online exhibit featuring the work of Nashville artist Ashley Mintz from Feb. 1 to March 12. Co-sponsored by the Kelly Miller Smith Institute on Black Church Studies, the exhibit is part of the Religion in the Arts and Contemporary Culture program, which is designed to create future leaders for ministry who understand and can harness the creativity of the arts for theological reflection and contemporary worship. Learn more here.

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