Summer 2017

More to the Story: Former Impact chairmen add to article about 1967 Symposium

More to the Story: Former Impact chairmen add to article about 1967 Symposium

As the chairmen of the first five Impact sym­posia, we are delighted when articles about this important and unique Vanderbilt institution are published, most recently the “Speak Up” article written by Andrew Maraniss in the Spring 2017 issue.

Charles D. King (PHOTO BY ROBERT ECTOR FOR ROBERT ECTOR PHOTOGRAPHY / GROOMING BY DEBRA DENSON / STYLING BY ANDREW WEITZ FOR THE WEITZ EFFECT)

Mogul in the Making: Charles D. King’s entertainment career is turning out just the way he scripted it

In 2015, King started MACRO, a media company focused on developing content for multicultural audiences. The company’s first major project was the movie Fences, directed by Denzel Washington and nominated for four Oscars last year.

Nicolas Mignard (1606-1668), French School. Portrait of Gabriel Nicolas de La Reynie (1625-1709) Lieutenant General of Police of Paris during the reign of Louis XIV. Private Collection. (Photo by: Christophel Fine Art/UIG via Getty Images)

Let There Be Light: Paris’ first police chief exposes the unholy work afoot in the ‘crime capital of the world’

in the latest book by Vanderbilt Professor of French Holly Tucker—City of Light, City of Poison: Murder, Magic, and the First Police Chief of Paris (2017, Norton)—she recounts the true-crime saga of a string of murders that plagued Paris in the late 1600s—and how the city’s first police chief stopped them.

The Writing That Binds: Two decades after a botched interview, two college friends reconnect

The Writing That Binds: Two decades after a botched interview, two college friends reconnect

By Bryant Palmer, BA’95   It’s 1994, and I’m in the offices of the Vanderbilt Hustler at 10 a.m. on a Wednesday. I spend as much time here as anywhere else on campus, but not usually this early. I’ve got a phone interview, not with a dean about another newsRead More

Brainiac: With her innovative ‘brain soup,’ Suzana Herculano-Houzel is changing neuroscience one species at a time

Brainiac: With her innovative ‘brain soup,’ Suzana Herculano-Houzel is changing neuroscience one species at a time

When she finally applied her “brain soup” technique to the human brain, Herculano-Houzel discovered we have an average of 86 billion neurons. Surprisingly, though, the neuron density is the same as in other primates, showing a clear evolutionary pattern from monkeys to humans. “We somehow manage to have this large brain with a large number of neurons; but it’s still just a regular primate brain,” says Herculano-Houzel.