Skip to main content

Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center Archives

Team identifies new gene candidates for breast cancer risk

Jun. 28, 2018—An international coalition led by scientists at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and the QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute in Herston, Australia, has identified 48 candidate susceptibility genes for breast cancer risk, including 14 genes at loci (chromosome regions) not yet reported for breast cancer.

Read more


Study finds higher death rates in poor neighborhoods

Jan. 18, 2018—Living in an economically disadvantaged neighborhood is likely to lead to death at an earlier age, especially among African-Americans, new research shows. The death rate is even more pronounced among disadvantaged individuals with unhealthy lifestyle habits.

Read more


Searching out pancreatic cancer risk

Dec. 7, 2017—Vanderbilt researchers have identified a biomarker that could be used to predict pancreatic cancer risk.

Read more


Researchers seek best ways to increase HPV vaccination rates

May. 11, 2017—Tennessee has one of the lowest human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination rates in the nation, and investigators at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) are hoping to change this by improving the way medical providers present these vaccines to patients and by improving patient and patient family education.

Read more


Exercise during teen years linked to lowered risk of cancer death later

Aug. 4, 2015—Women who exercised during their teen years were less likely to die from cancer and all other causes during middle-age and later in life, according to a new study by investigators at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and the Shanghai Cancer Institute in China.

Read more


Healthy diet linked to lower death rates among low-income residents in Southeastern U.S.

Jun. 29, 2015—A low-fat diet rich in plants, whole grains and seafood, and low in red and processed meats, sweets and sugary drinks was linked with a lower risk of dying from heart disease, stroke, cancer or other diseases among a population of low-income, mostly African American individuals living in the Southeast.

Read more


Cancer survival improvements vary by age, race

Feb. 26, 2015—Improvements in cancer diagnosis and treatment have led to longer survival for most cancer patients in the United States. However, the improvement in survival was substantially greater among younger patients and those who are white in most of the cancers studied, according to new research by Vanderbilt University investigators.

Read more


Low selenium and lung cancer

Aug. 6, 2014—Vanderbilt researchers have found that selenium deficiency may contribute to the racial disparity in lung cancer incidence.

Read more


Cancer studies reveal new genetic variants

Apr. 4, 2013—The future of cancer is becoming clearer. And it’s not looking so good for cancer.

Read more


Complementary and alternative medicine use differs by race, economics

Oct. 9, 2012—Use of complementary and alternative medicine differs by race and socioeconomic factors, study reports.

Read more


African ancestry, stomach bug link

Aug. 16, 2012—Socioeconomic factors, African ancestry linked to risk for cancer-causing infection.

Read more


Kids’ cells okay after mom’s cancer radiation

Jun. 22, 2012—Study finds no evidence of increased mitochondrial mutations in the children of women treated with radiation for cancer.

Read more


Upcoming Events

MORE EVENTS »