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Southern Community Cohort Study Archives

Study finds higher death rates in poor neighborhoods

Jan. 18, 2018—Living in an economically disadvantaged neighborhood is likely to lead to death at an earlier age, especially among African-Americans, new research shows. The death rate is even more pronounced among disadvantaged individuals with unhealthy lifestyle habits.

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Role for mouth microbes in diabetes?

Mar. 8, 2017—A higher abundance of certain bacterial species in the mouth appears to reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes, Vanderbilt investigators have discovered.

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Cancer prevention and poverty

Mar. 31, 2016—A new epidemiological study supports smoking cessation and avoidance of sedentary lifestyle as cancer prevention measures.

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Healthy diet linked to lower death rates among low-income residents in Southeastern U.S.

Jun. 29, 2015—A low-fat diet rich in plants, whole grains and seafood, and low in red and processed meats, sweets and sugary drinks was linked with a lower risk of dying from heart disease, stroke, cancer or other diseases among a population of low-income, mostly African American individuals living in the Southeast.

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Low selenium and lung cancer

Aug. 6, 2014—Vanderbilt researchers have found that selenium deficiency may contribute to the racial disparity in lung cancer incidence.

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Stomach bugs impact nutrient levels

Jun. 30, 2011—Helicobacter pylori, a bacterium that infects half of the world’s population and increases the risk for stomach cancer, appears to impair nutrient absorption.

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Cancer Center study snuffs out menthol myths

Mar. 24, 2011—People who smoke mentholated cigarettes are no more likely to develop lung cancer or die from the disease than are smokers of non-mentholated brands, a new study shows.

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