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MEDIA ADVISORY: Gifted high school students learn about the power of the extremely small in Vanderbilt summer camp

Jun. 29, 2010—Eighteen gifted and talented high school students are spending the week on the Vanderbilt campus learning how nanoscience – the science of the very small – is impacting everything from the formulation of concrete to drug delivery systems. The nanoscience camp is one of a number of different camps being sponsored by the Vanderbilt Summer...

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How cancer cells lose their (circadian) rhythm

May. 10, 2010— Immortality and uncontrolled cell division are the fundamental differences between cancer cells and normal cells.

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Physics teachers give Scherrer its science communications award

Apr. 30, 2010— Although Robert Scherrer, chair of the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Vanderbilt University, is a highly regarded cosmologist and an award-winning teacher, the American Association of Physics Teachers (AAPT) has selected him as the 2010 recipient of its Klopsteg Memorial Award based on his work as a published science fiction writer.

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Scientific team receives award for networking toolkit

Apr. 29, 2010— Vanderbilt Professor of Physics Paul Sheldon heads a multi-institutional team that has received an Internet2 award for a networking system that they have developed to make it easier to move and store mountains of digital data.

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Vanderbilt physicist plays pivotal role in discovery of new super-heavy element

Apr. 7, 2010—Vanderbilt physicist Joe Hamilton played a key role in the discovery of element 117, a new super-heavy element that has been created and identified by an international scientific team. Discovery of the new element provides new information about the basic organization of matter and strengthens the likelihood that still more massive elements may form an "island of stability": a cluster of stable super-heavy elements that could form novel materials with exotic and as yet unimagined scientific and practical applications.

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Hubble Telescope scientist, nebulae expert and VU professor to examine biggest Fourth of July explosion in history

Apr. 5, 2010—C. Robert O'Dell, Distinguished Research Professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Vanderbilt, will deliver the lecture "What Blew Up on the Fourth of July in 1054? The Crab Nebula of Course" on Tuesday, April 13, at 7 p.m. at the Vanderbilt Dyer Observatory.

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Media Advisory: Official opening of virtual control room allows Vanderbilt physicists to participate in world’s largest particle accelerator without leaving campus

Mar. 29, 2010—On Tuesday, March 30, Vanderbilt's high-energy physicists are opening a virtual control room that will allow them to participate fully in the experiments that will be conducted on the world's largest particle accelerator, the $9 billion Large Hadron Collider located in Switzerland. The LHC is beginning its research program on Tuesday and the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), which operates the machine, has invited the world's science press to cover the event.

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View the stars for free at Vanderbilt Dyer Observatory’s Open Telescope Nights

Mar. 23, 2010—Vanderbilt's Dyer Observatory is free and open to the public March through November during monthly Open House Telescope Nights and Open House Days.

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Psychopaths’ brains wired to seek rewards, no matter the consequences

Mar. 16, 2010—The brains of psychopaths appear to be wired to keep seeking a reward at any cost, new research from Vanderbilt University finds. The research uncovers the role of the brain's reward system in psychopathy and opens a new area of study for understanding what drives these individuals.

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Vanderbilt professor offers key factors in recruiting minorities, women to critical science, engineering careers

Mar. 16, 2010—Identification of students with unrealized potential, continuous tracking of individual performance and intensive, one-on-one mentoring are key factors in successfully recruiting underrepresented minorities and women into the critical professions of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM).

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Human cells exhibit foraging behavior like amoebae and bacteria

Mar. 11, 2010—When cells move about in the body, they follow a complex pattern similar to that which amoebae and bacteria use when searching for food, a team of Vanderbilt researchers have found.

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Why surprises temporarily blind us

Mar. 10, 2010—Reading this story requires you to willfully pay attention to the sentences and to tune out nearby conversations, the radio and other distractions. But if a fire alarm sounded, your attention would be involuntarily snatched away from the story to the blaring sound. New research from Vanderbilt University reveals for the first time how our brains coordinate these two types of attention and why we may be temporarily blinded by surprises.

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