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Recent gifts boost Dyer Observatory’s public outreach ability

Jan. 15, 2003—Since opening its doors 50 years ago, Vanderbilt’s Arthur J. Dyer Observatory has introduced thousands of Nashvillians to the world of astronomy through school tours, public observation nights and other community programs.

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Clinicians’ personal theories influence diagnoses of mental disorders

Dec. 17, 2002— Despite the considerable effort that leaders in the field of clinical psychology have taken to make the diagnosis of mental disorders an “objective” process, the theoretical beliefs of clinicians still appear to play a major role in the process.

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Designing a robot that can sense human emotion

Dec. 16, 2002— Forget the robot child in the movie “AI.” Vanderbilt researchers Nilanjan Sarkar and Craig Smith have a less romantic but more practical idea in mind.

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Psychologist Carol Gilligan to give Lecture on Great Teaching at Vanderbilt

Oct. 25, 2002— Acclaimed social psychologist and New York University professor Carol Gilligan will discuss “Teaching and Learning in a Different Voice” on Monday, Nov. 11, at 6 p.m. in Ingram Hall at Vanderbilt’s Blair School of Music.

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Making “smart devices” even smarter is the goal of $13 million national effort

Oct. 15, 2002— Today, it seems as if all the devices we use are becoming “smart.”

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Vanderbilt address to explore “Nonsense, Non-Science and Science: From Aliens to Creationism”

Oct. 8, 2002— Lawrence Krauss, professor of physics and astronomy at Case Western Reserve University, will discuss “Nonsense, Non-Science and Science: From Aliens to Creationism” on Monday, Oct. 14, at 6 p.m. in Turner Hall at Vanderbilt’s Blair School of Music. The event is free and open to the public. A reception with Krauss precedes the lecture at 5 p.m.

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Deciphering the genetic basis of the mosquito’s senses

Oct. 2, 2002— The mosquito Anopheles gambiae is something of a gourmet. It feeds almost exclusively on human blood. Its preference for humans and its ability to seek them out, in fact, are what makes the tiny insect such a deadly “vector” for the spread of malaria, a disease that causes millions of deaths annually.

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Living with the West Nile threat

Oct. 2, 2002— The West Nile virus is here to stay, but there is no reason for panic.

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Tennessee facing critical environmental issues in coming decade, say Vanderbilt researchers

Sep. 23, 2002— One of the biggest issues facing future state leaders is the management of environmental threats to Tennessee’s land, water and air quality, according to three papers by Vanderbilt University researchers.

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Vanderbilt biologist receives $1 million from Howard Hughes Medical Institute to start an innovative undergraduate science education program

Sep. 18, 2002— Vanderbilt molecular biologist Ellen Fanning is one of 20 research scientists nationwide who will each receive $1 million over the next four years from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute in a new program intended to encourage researchers to put as much creativity into undergraduate education as they have into research.

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Hercules, McCoy receive Vanderbilt faculty awards

Sep. 11, 2002— David M. Hercules, the Centennial Professor of Chemistry and chair of the Department of Chemistry, and Thomas R. McCoy, professor of law, were recognized for their contributions during the recent Vanderbilt fall faculty assembly.

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Attention is key to binding the color and shape of bananas and other visual objects

Aug. 7, 2002— When you gaze at a bowl of fruit, why don\'t some of the bananas look red, some of the apples look purple and some of the grapes look yellow?

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