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World-class mathematician joins Vanderbilt faculty

Sep. 4, 2003—Alain Connes, widely considered to be one of the three most influential living mathematicians, has accepted a position of distinguished professor at Vanderbilt, enabling the University to become a base for training new mathematicians to fill the ranks left vacant by a retiring generation of scholars.

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School of Nursing Announces Partnership with Middle Tennessee School of Anesthesia

Aug. 13, 2003—The Vanderbilt University School of Nursing has signed an agreement with Middle Tennessee School of Anesthesia (MTSA) to offer graduates of Vanderbilt's Acute Care Nurse Practitioner (ACNP) Program an early interview and potential acceptance in MTSA's highly competitive Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist (CRNA) program.

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MEDIA ADVISORY-Summer students design cameras to track toy flying saucers and program robots to run mazes

Aug. 7, 2003—Nearly a dozen undergraduate students from around the Southeast have been spending the summer at Vanderbilt University getting a taste of real-life engineering research as part of a summer internship at the Institute for Software-Integrated Systems.

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USC/Vanderbilt software has right stuff:wins $5.74 million contract to improve safety of Marine Corps air operations

Aug. 6, 2003—In the near future, when Marine Corps pilots climb into the cockpit for a training flight or an actual combat mission, they will do so with confidence that the possibility of human error in every operational aspect of their mission from aircraft maintenance to flight scheduling has been minimized by the use of customized software developed by Vanderbilt University and the University of Southern California.

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The bigger and brighter an object, the harder it is to perceive its motion

Jul. 17, 2003—"The bigger an object, the easier it is to see. But it is actually harder for people to determine the motion of objects larger than a tennis ball held at arms length than it is to gauge the motion of smaller objects," says Duje Tadin, first author of the paper on the study appearing in the July 17 issue of the journal Nature. Tadin is a graduate student in psychology at Vanderbilt and his co-authors are postdoctoral fellow Lee A. Gilroy and professors Joseph S. Lappin and Randolph Blake.

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Hoffman and Novak articles recognized for top percentage increase in citations by business and economics researchers

Jul. 9, 2003—Donna L. Hoffman and Thomas P. Novak, professors of marketing at the Owen Graduate School of Management at Vanderbilt University, have been recognized by ISI Essential Science Indicators for having the highest percent increase in total academic article citations for the most recent trackinig period in the entire field of economics and business.

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West Nile Tipsheet

Jul. 7, 2003—West Nile Virus is an Emerging Health Threat But BewareóA More Dangerous Mosquito-Transmitted Disease is Heading Our Way, According to a Vanderbilt Researcher

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VUMC doctors perform first robotic surgery

May. 28, 2003—Vanderbilt's first robotic surgical procedure was performed in mid May by Dr. Joseph A. Smith Jr., William L. Bray Professor and Chair of Urologic Surgery. Smith used VUMC's new $1 million-plus Da Vinci Surgical System, built by Intuitive Surgical, to perform a radical prostatectomy.

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Study looks at genetically altering commercial sunflowers: Is it harmful to the environment?

May. 22, 2003—Arguments for and against genetically altering plants, fruits and vegetables continue.

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MEDIA ADVISORY–Eminent astronomer giving public lecture in Nashville

May. 21, 2003—The eminent astronomer David Weedman, who is a Nashville native and graduate of Vanderbilt, will be delivering a free public lecture on Tuesday evening, May 27.

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Astronomer to describe the edge of the visible universe at public lecture

May. 14, 2003—Imagine a single, star-like object that burns with as much energy as billions of stars in hundreds of galaxies combined. Such objects exist. They are called quasars and are just one of the nearly unimaginable astronomical objects that eminent astronomer David Weedman will describe in the free public lecture, “Seyfert Galaxies, Quasars and the Edge of the Universe.”, on May 27.

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Trojan Horse-like mechanism may hold key to new HIV knowledge

May. 7, 2003—New findings provide evidence of a Trojan Horse-like mechanism whereby HIV infiltrates the immune system undetected and then exploits the system to promote its own survival.

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