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Registration underway for fall term of Retirement Learning at Vanderbilt, Topics include politics, business ethics and musical theater

Sep. 7, 2004—Presidential elections, modern poetry and health care are among the wide-ranging non-credit classes available to the public during the fall term of Retirement Learning at Vanderbilt.

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Vanderbilt rises to 25th in the nation in federal research and development funding

Sep. 2, 2004—An increase in funding of nearly 100 percent in four years has put Vanderbilt among the top 25 U.S. universities for the first time in recent history in terms of the amount of federally supported research and development projects that it conducts.

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Expert in scientific testing of learning ability to speak at Kennedy Center

Aug. 31, 2004—Richard Woodcock, a world-renowned researcher of learning ability assessment, will present a lecture on historical advances in cognitive assessment on Thursday, Sept. 9, at 4 p.m. at the Vanderbilt Kennedy Center for Research on Human Development. The lecture will take place in Room 241 of the Kennedy Center/MRL Building and is free and open to the public.

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Vanderbilt University professor joins National Science Foundation for yearlong stint

Aug. 27, 2004—Vanderbilt University professor Robert D. Sherwood is on loan from the university to the National Science Foundation (NSF), where he will play an integral role in the funding of research and education.

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Testing the fitness of biological clocks

Aug. 23, 2004—Microscopic pacemakers--also known as circadian clocks--are found in everything from pond scum to human beings and appear to help organize a dizzying array of biochemical processes. A study performed by researchers at Vanderbilt University and published in the Aug. 24 issue of the journal Current Biology sheds new light on this issue.

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Genetic model for devastating form of paraplegia suggests new treatments

Jul. 15, 2004—A new genetic model for a motor disorder that confines an estimated 10,000 people in the United States to walkers and wheelchairs indicates that instability in the microscopic scaffolding within a key set of nerve cells is the cause of this devastating disability.

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Secret behind hard exoskeletons, spreading wings revealed

Jul. 13, 2004—A team of biologists has discovered the structure and genetic sequence of the hormone that makes insects develop their hard outer shells and allows them to spread their wings. The findings answer more than 40 years of questions about insect development.

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Dark matter and dark energy may be different aspects of a single unknown force

Jun. 30, 2004—In the last few decades, scientists have discovered that there is a lot more to the universe than meets the eye: The cosmos appears to be filled with not just one, but two invisible constituents-dark matter and dark energy-whose existence has been proposed based solely on their gravitational effects on ordinary matter and energ

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Dyer institute connects future scientists with renowned space explorers

Jun. 21, 2004—Tennessee teachers and students will work with astronauts, astronomers and other leading space explorers at an interactive summer institute hosted by Dyer Observatory the week of June 21.

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Archaeologist’s partnership with Maya villagers pays off in looters’ conviction

Jun. 11, 2004—For nearly two decades, Vanderbilt University archaeologist Arthur Demarest has explored the rainforests of Guatemala for clues to the ancient Mayas. Along the way, he has formed an alliance with the descendants of that once-powerful civilization to not only uncover but also preserve their proud heritage. That partnership paid off earlier this month with the conviction and sentencing of a gang of looters.

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Seeing is believing, even when what we see is ambiguous or misleading

Jun. 11, 2004—Seeing is believing, even when what we see is ambiguous or misleading. New Vanderbilt research has found that the brain continues to accept ambiguous visual information about an object in motion even when it conflicts with more reliable information that we can touch.

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Vanderbilt seeks participants for study on brain activity in children with math and reading disabilities

Jun. 8, 2004—Vanderbilt University is seeking participants for the first phase of a study to learn more about brain activity in children with math or reading disabilities. The ultimate goal of the study, "Remediating Students' Mathematics Disabilities," is to overcome math disability and to examine how brain functioning changes with remediation.

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