Skip to main content

psychology

Study gives new meaning to ‘let your fingers do the walking’

Dec. 4, 2013—A new study has found that skilled typists can’t identify the positions of many of the keys on the QWERTY keyboard and that novice typists don’t appear to learn key locations in the first place.

Read more


Math education expert selected for NGA roundtable

Dec. 3, 2013—Peabody's Bethany Rittle-Johnson was one of a select group of education professionals invited to participate in the National Governors Association Expert Roundtable for Strengthening Early Mathematics Education.

Read more


Jon Kaas wins major neuroscience award

Nov. 14, 2013—Jon Kaas is the 2014 recipient of the George A. Miller Prize in Cognitive Neuroscience, which recognizes individuals whose research has had a revolutionary impact on the field.

Read more


Even in the dark, brain “sees” its own body’s movement

Oct. 30, 2013—With the help of computerized eye trackers, new research finds that at least 50 percent of people can see the movement of their own hand even in the absence of all light.

Read more


VUCast: A wireless capsule and hallucinating without drugs

Oct. 30, 2013—See how a wireless capsule could help during minimally invasive surgeries Why magnesium and vitamin D are a match made in heaven And do you really see the S in the USA network logo? Watch this QuickVU roundup of research stories.

Read more


Live Science: Conservatives and liberals equally smug, study finds

Oct. 9, 2013—New research by postdoctoral fellow Kaitlin Toner suggests liberals and conservatives are about equally convinced of the correctness of their views, but extremists are more likely than moderates to feel their views are superior.

Read more


Cho receives prestigious National Academy of Education fellowship award

Oct. 1, 2013—Sun-Joo Cho, assistant professor of psychology and human development at Vanderbilt’s Peabody College of education and human development, has been named a 2013 National Academy of Education (NAE)/Spencer Postdoctoral Fellow.

Read more


Finding the place where the brain creates illusory shapes and surfaces

Sep. 30, 2013—Neuroscientists have identified the location in the brain's visual cortex responsible for generating a common perceptual illusion: seeing shapes and surfaces that don't really exist when viewing a fragmented background.

Read more


Two Vanderbilt professors part of PBS series ‘Brains on Trial’ Sept. 11 and 18

Sep. 5, 2013—Research conducted at Vanderbilt is featured in "Brains on Trial with Alan Alda," a two-part televised series airing Sept. 11 and Sept. 18 on PBS that explores how the growing ability to separate truth from lies may radically affect the way criminal trials are conducted in the future.

Read more


$10M grant establishes center to boost outcomes for children with learning disabilities

Aug. 27, 2013—A team of Vanderbilt professors will develop new math and reading strategies aimed at improving student success with the support of a new $10 million federal grant.

Read more


Validating maps of the brain’s resting state

Jun. 19, 2013—A team of Vanderbilt researchers has provided important validation of maps of the brain at rest that may offer insights into changes in the brain that occur in neurological and psychiatric diseases.

Read more


National Geographic: The mystery of risk

May. 16, 2013—What exactly pushed Christopher Columbus to embark on a voyage across the Atlantic, or Edward Jenner to test his theory for an early smallpox vaccine on a child, or Henry Ford to bet that automobiles could replace horses? David Zald, professor of psychology, studies risk-taking and is quoted.

Read more


VIEW MORE EVENTS >