Skip to main content

NIH Archives

Protein family key to aging linked to suppressing tumors

Oct. 28, 2011—The list of aging-associated proteins known to be involved in cancer is growing longer, according to research by investigators at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center and the National Institutes of Health.

Read more


Growth factor boosts beta cells

Oct. 21, 2011—A growth factor may help grow transplantation-quality pancreas cells for treating diabetes.

Read more


Information flow reduced in psychosis

Oct. 21, 2011—Bipolar depression and schizophrenia share patterns of changes in neurons that regulate information flow, new research shows.

Read more


Predicting hospital readmission is risky business: study

Oct. 18, 2011—Each year millions of Americans return to the hospital within 30 days of their previous discharge. Although many readmissions could be preventable, most statistical models for predicting them "perform poorly," according to researchers at Vanderbilt and the Oregon Health and Science University and their affiliated VA medical centers.

Read more


Discoveries show value of federal support

Oct. 13, 2011—An update on federally funded projects at Vanderbilt and their impact on efforts to improve education, protect people from disease and meet our nation’s energy needs.

Read more


Supplements don’t help lung injury patients

Oct. 13, 2011—Supplements did not improve outcomes of patients with acute lung injury.

Read more


Robot biologist solves complex problem from scratch

Oct. 13, 2011—A team of scientists has taken a major step toward developing robot biologists. They have shown that their system, the Automated Biology Explorer, can solve a complicated biology problem from scratch.

Read more


Study puts a new spin on ibuprofen’s actions

Sep. 29, 2011—Vanderbilt University investigators have discovered surprising new insights into the actions of NSAIDs.

Read more


New technique maps twin faces of smallest Janus nanoparticles

Sep. 26, 2011—Vanderbilt chemists have developed the first method that can rapidly and accurately map the surfaces of tiny particles that possess two chemically distinct faces. The findings have broad potential applications ranging from drug delivery to video displays.

Read more


New drug-like molecules could improve schizophrenia treatment

Sep. 22, 2011—The discovery of new compounds that work in a fundamentally different way than those in existing schizophrenia medications may allow for more normal function of brain cells involved in schizophrenia.

Read more


Infants at risk for autism could benefit from motor training

Sep. 9, 2011—Early motor experiences can shape infants’ preferences for objects and faces, new research indicates. The study supports evidence that early motor development and experiences contribute to infants’ understanding of their world and implies that when motor skills are delayed or impaired – as in autism – future social interactions could be negatively impacted.

Read more


Getting the right fit for hearing aids

Sep. 8, 2011—The pattern of hearing loss across sound frequencies affects the benefit from hearing aids.

Read more


Upcoming Events

MORE EVENTS »