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National Eye Institute Archives

Finally, a type of face that men recognize better than women

Nov. 16, 2016—A study finds men are better at recognizing Transformer faces while women are better at recognizing Barbie faces, supporting the theory that we're more likely to recognize what we're used to seeing.

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Education and Psychology Research


‘Audacious’ grant spurs research on retina regeneration

Sep. 1, 2016—Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and Vanderbilt University have received a $1.9 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to support research to restore vision through regeneration of the retina.

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Health and Medicine Reporter Research


In the brain, the number of neurons in a network may not matter

Feb. 3, 2014—A study has found that the time it takes neural networks in the brain to make decisions is remarkably stable regardless of size: a finding that could make it easier to achieve the goal of the President's BRAIN Initiative established last spring.

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Life, Earth and Space Research


Finding the place where the brain creates illusory shapes and surfaces

Sep. 30, 2013—Neuroscientists have identified the location in the brain's visual cortex responsible for generating a common perceptual illusion: seeing shapes and surfaces that don't really exist when viewing a fragmented background.

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Life, Earth and Space releases Research


NIH lauds Rex’s ideas for future of vision research

Feb. 14, 2013—Tonia Rex, Ph.D., assistant professor of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences at the Vanderbilt Eye Institute, was recently named one of 10 winners of the National Institutes of Health competition for ideas on the future of vision research.

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Reporter


Clear vision of protein interactions

Aug. 5, 2011—Researchers identify protein partners that may keep the lens of the eye transparent – and free from cataracts.

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Health and Medicine Research


Identification of glaucoma gene brightens future for therapies

Feb. 24, 2011—Researchers have identified a new candidate gene for the most common form of glaucoma, which runs in families. The findings offer novel insights into glaucoma pathology and could lead to targeted treatment strategies.

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Health and Medicine Research