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infectious diseases Archives

Sugars in human mother’s milk are non-toxic antibacterial agents

Aug. 20, 2017—A new study has found that sugars in mother's' milk do not just provide nutrition for babies but also help protect them from bacterial infections.

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VUSM student’s research poster lauded at international meeting

Aug. 4, 2016—A Vanderbilt University School of Medicine (VUSM) student recently received international recognition when his poster presentation at a major infectious diseases conference was voted the best from among 600 presenters and 1,500 attendees.

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Wright loves her patients and their mysteries

Jul. 21, 2016—Everyone knew everyone in Patty Wright’s hometown of Scottsville, Kentucky, population 4,336.

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Reporter


VUMC joins Human Vaccine Project as first scientific hub

Jul. 16, 2015—Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC), the Human Vaccines Project and the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative (IAVI) announced this week that VUMC has become the project’s first scientific hub.

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‘Resistance’ film looks at antibiotics dangers

Aug. 22, 2014—Eighty years after antibiotics revolutionized medicine we are facing potential catastrophe.

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Target cell entry to halt Chikungunya virus

Apr. 28, 2014—Understanding how chikungunya virus binds to and enters cells offers a new target for antiviral medications.

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Photo: Discovery Lecture

Mar. 14, 2013—Scott Hultgren, Ph.D., director of the Center for Women’s Infectious Disease Research at Washington University in St. Louis, talked about improving therapies for urinary tract infections during his recent Flexner Discovery Lecture.

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Reporter


Host proteins can control HIV infection

Oct. 5, 2012—The protein APOBEC3G contributes to spontaneous control of HIV-1 in vivo and may provide therapeutic benefits.

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