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genetics

Tool finds connections in genome data

Feb. 8, 2012—A new analytical tool points to genes that act together to increase disease risk.

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Obesity genes linked to uterine cancer

Jan. 20, 2012—In addition to body mass index, genetic markers of obesity may provide value in predicting endometrial cancer risk.

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Study applies random genotype sets to new disease

Jan. 5, 2012—A new study in the American Journal of Human Genetics, led by Vanderbilt researchers Josh Denny, M.D., M.S., and Dana Crawford, Ph.D., takes random volumes of human genotypes and matches them with data siphoned from de-identified medical records and sheds new light on the genetic basis of the common disease hypothyroidism. In a research lab,...

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Divvying up chromosomes

Dec. 15, 2011—Protein helps ensure proper division of chromosomes during cell division.

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Skeletal defects in genetic disorder

Nov. 18, 2011—A new mouse model provides a tool for testing novel therapeutic approaches for neurofibromatosis.

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Project seeks to apply gene testing to drug prescribing

Nov. 11, 2011—The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has awarded Vanderbilt researchers a two-year, $1 million grant to Vanderbilt to develop a model for applying genomic testing to drug prescribing in “real-world” settings.

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Vanderbilt doctors to screen patients taking statins for genetic risk factors

Oct. 28, 2011—Vanderbilt University Medical Center doctors announced today they will begin screening patients who take commonly prescribed statin drugs for a rare genetic variation that can increase risks for side effects from these drugs such as muscle aches, kidney damage and even death.

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Examining the ethics of sharing genetic risk information

Sep. 28, 2011—Should scientists inform participants in genomic studies about their risk for diseases or conditions discovered during the studies, and if so, when and how? A Vanderbilt professor is part of a team working to answer these questions.

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Discovery of how G proteins ‘turn on’ may lead to better drugs

Aug. 18, 2011—Researchers have discovered how key proteins are “turned on” and transmit signals inside the cell. The discovery could lead to new, more effective drugs.

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Number of genes associated with MS doubled

Aug. 10, 2011—An international team of scientists has identified 29 new genetic variants linked to multiple sclerosis, providing key insights into the biology of an important and very debilitating neurological disease.

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Jumping genes make the funny pages

Jun. 24, 2011—  Every so often a piece of research makes it into the popular culture. That is the case with the discovery of Vanderbilt biologists Antonis Rokas and Jason Slot that entire gene clusters have jumped between unrelated species of mold millions of years ago. Their findings, which were reported last February, came as a major...

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Real science in X-Men

Jun. 21, 2011—Here’s another reason to love the X-Men: real science. Listen carefully to the dialogue between Professor Charles Xavier and CIA agent Dr. Moira MacTaggart in the new movie, “X-Men: First Class,” and you’ll hear a reference to the MCR1 gene and auburn hair. MacTaggart: “Do you have a minute?” Professor X: “For a pretty little...

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