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featured research Archives

Exercise can curb marijuana use and cravings

Mar. 4, 2011—Just a few sessions on the treadmill can prevent marijuana cravings and use, new research finds.

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Campaign spending’s clear winner: Corporations

Mar. 2, 2011—Researchers discover corporations gain clear financial benefits when individual employees make political donations.

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Identification of glaucoma gene brightens future for therapies

Feb. 24, 2011—Researchers have identified a new candidate gene for the most common form of glaucoma, which runs in families. The findings offer novel insights into glaucoma pathology and could lead to targeted treatment strategies.

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Tennessee pre-k students see 82 percent gain over peers

Feb. 24, 2011—Students in Tennessee's state prekindergarten program experience an average of 82 percent greater gains in literacy and math skills over their peers who do not attend state pre-k.

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‘Glass ceiling’ exists for women surgeons

Feb. 21, 2011—Less than a third of surgeons who advance to senior ranks in the U.S. are women, and it's not because they're less qualified or less productive than their male counterparts, new research finds.

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New model to test how antidepressants work

Feb. 18, 2011—A new mouse model offers the ability to better test how selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) work and could lead to the development of new classes of anti-depressants.

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The Invisible Line: American families’ journeys from black to white

Feb. 17, 2011—African Americans have continually crossed the color line and assimilated into white communities since the 17th century, without science or surgery. A new book reveals how, and why.

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Vanderbilt-pioneered fetal surgery procedure yields positive results

Feb. 9, 2011—Results of a landmark, seven-year National Institutes of Health-funded trial, Management of Myelomeningocele Study (MOMS), demonstrate clear benefit for babies who undergo fetal surgery to treat spina bifida, the most common birth defect in the central nervous system.

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Improving heart patients’ outcomes goal of nursing study

Feb. 9, 2011—Vanderbilt University Medical Center is participating in a multi-site, national study to identify the role nurses play in improving outcomes among heart failure patients. “Heart failure is being recognized as a huge issue in elderly and middle-aged people, and it has a profound effect on the ability to function and handle daily activities. It requires...

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What fourth-down decisions in pro football tell us about deadlines and risky decision making

Feb. 2, 2011—Try asking any Monday morning quarterback about blown fourth-down play calls in the NFL and you are guaranteed passionate opinions. In most fourth-down plays, an NFL team will punt or try for a field goal. But, occasionally, teams decide to do something that is viewed as risky – attempt a fourth-down conversion or “go for...

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Going underground in search of new drugs

Feb. 1, 2011—Every few months, chemist Brian Bachmann sheds his white lab coat, collects his flashlight, helmet, surgical gloves and knotted rope, puts on old clothes and hiking boots and heads to a nearby cave. Bachmann, an assistant professor of chemistry at Vanderbilt, has combined his industrial experience in natural products drug discovery with his undergraduate hobby...

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Vanderbilt joins consortium to discover and map all Alzheimer’s genes

Feb. 1, 2011—Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, and across the globe, announced today a multi-national collaboration to discover and map all genes relating to Alzheimer’s disease through the formation of the International Genomics of Alzheimer’s Project (IGAP). Alzheimer’s disease, a progressive, neurodegenerative disorder that is fatal, has no cure and available drugs only marginally affect disease...

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