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Food fight: How a community in Mexico used food to resist the Aztec empire

Oct. 1, 2019—Inspired by an ancient people’s use of food to resist defeat, anthropologist Keitlyn Alcantara now uses food to resist cultural loss among Latin American middle schoolers in Nashville.

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High standards of female songbirds could be driving their mates to evolve

Sep. 4, 2019—Picky females force male songbirds to become better singers.

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Public options can strengthen society: Vanderbilt law professor

Sep. 3, 2019—Robust public options for retirement, banking, child care and other broadly beneficial services – beyond health care – would position more Americans to participate equally in society, argues Vanderbilt law professor Ganesh Sitaraman in a new book.

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How peer pressure does—and doesn’t—influence our choices

Aug. 27, 2019—New research by marketing professor Kelly Haws helps explain why we match our friends' orders at a restaurant—but not exactly.

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When it comes to investing, love at first sight doesn’t always pay off

Aug. 20, 2019—It's very easy to get too attached to a particular investment—even when there are better options out there. New research by Vanderbilt business professors explains why it happens, and how to avoid it.

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Rare study of Earth-sized planet uses technique pioneered by Vanderbilt professor

Aug. 19, 2019—A groundbreaking study, using data from NASA and a technique pioneered by a Vanderbilt professor, is giving humankind a glimpse at a distant exoplanet with a size similar to Earth and a surface which may resemble Mercury or Earth’s Moon. Located nearly 49 light-years from Earth, the planet known as LHS 3844b was first discovered...

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Meet the alpacas that are helping researchers who study autism, Alzheimer’s and cancer

Aug. 13, 2019—Written by Heidi Hall Alpacas aren’t the typical animals that drivers spot as they wind their way through rural Tennessee, but there’s a happy herd of them outside Waverly, where they eat the finest pellets, walk up and down a scenic hill and potentially save lives. They’re owned by a team of Vanderbilt University researchers...

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Intense look at La Brea Tar Pits explains why we have coyotes, not saber-toothed cats

Aug. 5, 2019—The most detailed study to date of ancient predators trapped in the La Brea Tar Pits is helping Americans understand why today we’re dealing with coyotes dumping over garbage cans and not saber-toothed cats ripping our arms off.

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The momentum myth: Staggering primaries didn’t affect outcome of 2016 nominating contests

Jul. 29, 2019—During the 2016 primary season, voters didn't shift their preferences based on who was winning, according to an analysis of more than 325,000 tracking poll results.

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When legislatures can and can’t check executive powers

Jul. 29, 2019—The largest analysis of gubernatorial executive orders to date reveals important nuances that explain how and when legislatures can constrain executive power.

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Cellular soldiers designed to kill cancer cells that get loose during surgery, stop metastasis

Jul. 24, 2019—Cellular soldiers created using the body’s own defenses can track down and kill escaping cancer cells during surgeries, preventing metastasis and saving lives, a Vanderbilt University biomedical engineer has discovered, particularly in cases of triple negative breast cancer.

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Decline of U.S. auto industry linked to midcentury shift in production models

Jul. 18, 2019—A massive shift in production models by American automakers to limit the impact of labor unions may have unintentionally stifled innovation and led to the present decline of the U.S. auto industry, according to new research by Joshua Murray.

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