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Where are the quokkas? New study explains what happened to the “happiest animal in the world”

Feb. 21, 2020—The quokka, a small marsupial native to Australia, is an example of a species vulnerable to extinction in the country’s harsh surroundings. In a new study, researchers at Vanderbilt University demonstrate evidence for the dramatic decline of quokkas over the past century.

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How even school lunches can become a partisan issue

Feb. 17, 2020—Even a seemingly uncontroversial topic like school lunch nutrition can become politicized when the person advocating for it is a polarizing figure, finds political scientist Cindy Kam.

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Researchers say this simple trick could stop the spread of misinformation on social media

Feb. 11, 2020—Psychology professor Lisa Fazio conducted a study to see if asking people to explain why a headline is true or false affected their intention of sharing it on social media.

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How ants get angry: Precise “lock and key” process regulates aggression, acceptance

Feb. 3, 2020—In a new study, scientists at Vanderbilt report definitive evidence of a mechanism within ants that is responsible for unlocking aggression. The research—the first to pinpoint this mechanism and its precise role in ant biology—reports a social characteristic which could help account for their evolutionary success.

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‘Dialogic praxis’ enhances psychotherapeutic success for youth

Jan. 16, 2020—For young patients, therapy works best when they are encouraged to become co-experts in the search for answers, according to findings from a study in Brazil co-authored by Dominique Béhague.

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Engineers advance efforts to speed blood test results

Jan. 13, 2020—Vanderbilt engineers are working on a process that ultimately may allow patients to get blood test results fast.

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Vanderbilt-led team discovers new genetic disease and defines underlying mechanism

Jan. 13, 2020—An international research team has discovered a new genetic syndrome caused by mutation of a single gene and named it CATIFA, an acronym for its core symptoms.

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Post-9/11 wars may have killed twice as many Americans at home as in battle: Analysis

Dec. 17, 2019—An analysis by Kip Viscusi finds that the post-9/11 wars may have resulted in more than twice as many indirect deaths back home as were lost in battle, due to the diversion of war costs from the U.S. economy and the subsequent impact on the nation’s health.

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Vanderbilt archaeologists discover important medieval and Roman artifacts in ancient port city of Caesarea

Dec. 16, 2019—Vanderbilt archaeologists have uncovered clues to everyday life in the medieval Near East, as well as the best-preserved remains found to date of Herod’s Temple of Rome and Augustus, at the site of what was once a bustling port city on the Mediterranean.

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Hearsay plays a key role in how children perceive others, new study finds

Dec. 13, 2019—A new Vanderbilt report finds that children are highly influenced by what they overhear adults say about others.

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‘Tis the season to be stressed (and why you don’t have to be)

Dec. 12, 2019—The holidays can be stressful - between wrapping presents, overeating, reflecting on the past year, and shopping for presents - there is a lot to deal with. But many of these common issues can be explained (and combated) with science. Read what our Vanderbilt researchers have to say about these common holiday stressors.

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No, it doesn’t matter how nicely you wrap that gift. Except when it does.

Dec. 5, 2019—A neatly wrapped gift will impress your acquaintances, but might leave your loved ones feeling let down when the gift doesn't live up to expectations, suggests new research by Vanderbilt postdoctoral scholar Erick Mas.

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