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Department of Pediatrics Archives

Team’s study uncovers cellular responses to bird flu vaccine

Feb. 16, 2017—New research from Vanderbilt University eavesdrops on gene expression in human immune system cells before and after vaccination against bird flu.

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Neurologist Dalmau set for next Discovery Lecture

Feb. 16, 2017—Josep Dalmau, M.D., Ph.D., renowned for his studies of immune disorders affecting the brain and spinal cord, will deliver the next Flexner Discovery Lecture on Thursday, Feb. 23.

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Saliva test for obesity risk

Jan. 24, 2017—“Epigenetic signatures” in DNA may present an opportunity for prevention of or early intervention in childhood obesity.

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A heart-brain connection

Jan. 17, 2017—Cognitive and attention deficits observed in children following surgery before age 5 to repair congenital heart defects likely will persist into their teens and young adulthood.

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Vanderbilt-led study finds parent’s physical activity associated with preschooler activity in underserved populations

Jan. 10, 2017—Preschool-age children from low-income families are more likely to be physically active if parents increase activity and reduce sedentary behavior while wearing movement monitors (accelerometers), according to a Vanderbilt study published today in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Paper or screen, which is better?

Jan. 10, 2017—To improve medical management of crisis situations, clinicians should be trained to use cognitive aids – checklists and concise manuals.

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Allergists say alpha-gal red meat allergy better understood, as numbers continue to increase

Dec. 21, 2016—Doctors at the Vanderbilt’s Asthma, Sinus and Allergy Program (ASAP) have continued to see an increase in the number of patients being treated for alpha-gal syndrome, commonly known as the red meat allergy, and with that increase has come more knowledge about management and treatment of the restrictive allergy.

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Babies born with opioid withdrawal disproportionately increasing in rural areas

Dec. 15, 2016—An increasing number of newborns are being born with drug withdrawal symptoms from opioids in rural areas of the United States as compared to births in urban areas, according to a JAMA Pediatrics study.

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Type of psychotherapy matters in treatment of irritable bowel syndrome

Dec. 12, 2016—A new study has found that the type of psychotherapy used to treat the gastrointestinal disorder irritable bowel syndrome makes a difference in improving patients' daily functioning.

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Plasmin prevents muscle ‘hardening’ after injury: study

Dec. 8, 2016—Vanderbilt researchers have made the surprising discovery that the protease plasmin, known for its clot-busting role in the blood, protects soft tissue from turning to bone after severe injuries and certain orthopaedic surgeries.

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Blood-brain barrier on a chip sheds new light on “silent killer”

Dec. 6, 2016—A new microfluidic device containing human cells that faithfully mimics the behavior of the blood-brain barrier is providing new insights into brain inflammation, the silent killer.

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Study tests shorter antibiotic course in children

Dec. 1, 2016—Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) are leading a multicenter clinical trial to evaluate whether a shorter course of antibiotics — five days instead of 10 — is effective at treating community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in children who show improvement after the first few days of taking antibiotics.

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