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Department of Health Policy Archives

Vanderbilt study explores how dual-eligible beneficiaries spend

Aug. 17, 2018—People who qualify for both Medicaid and Medicare tend to have very serious, complex health problems, but new research by Laura Keohane shows that their rate of healthcare spending is not rising any faster than that of people eligible for just Medicare.

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Study to explore how rising medication costs impact elderly

Aug. 9, 2018—A team led by Stacie Dusetzina has received a grant to determine whether rising drug prices and out-of-pocket expenses are causing older Americans enrolled in Medicare Part D to delay or never fill their prescriptions.

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Legalizing same-sex marriage increased health care access for gay men: Vanderbilt study

Jul. 11, 2018—One of the first studies to examine the health impacts of legal marriage for LGBT individuals has found gay men were more likely to receive routine medical care following marriage legalization.

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Addressing the opioid crisis

May. 24, 2018—U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams, MD, MPH, visited Vanderbilt University Medical Center last week to speak at the spring Health Policy Grand Rounds at Langford Auditorium. The event was dedicated to combatting America’s opioid crisis, and Adams emphasized the importance of the overdose-reversal drug naloxone.

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Early discharge of NAS infants prolongs treatment

May. 17, 2018—Infants who are diagnosed with drug withdrawal after birth who are treated with medication as outpatients at home are treated three times longer than infants treated solely as inpatients, according to a new Vanderbilt study.

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Study finds generic options offer limited savings for expensive drugs

May. 9, 2018—Generic drug options did not reduce prices paid for the cancer therapy imatinib (Gleevec), according to a Health Affairs study released this week.

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Speakers discuss use of evidence in state health policymaking

Apr. 19, 2018—“State Health Policy: Does Evidence Really Make a Difference” was the title of the spring Research into Policy and Practice Lecture, April 11 in Light Hall. The semi-annual lecture is sponsored by the Department of Health Policy.

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Study tracks impact of NAS on state Medicaid programs 

Mar. 23, 2018—In the United States, one infant is born every 15 minutes with withdrawal symptoms after being exposed to opioids before birth, according to a new study published in the journal Pediatrics.

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Discussing the opioid crises

Feb. 15, 2018—Stephen Patrick, MD, MPH, MS, assistant professor of Pediatrics and Health Policy in the Division of Neonatology at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt, testified before Congress recently about the rise and impact of drug withdrawal symptoms in newborns, also known as neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS).

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Opioid use increases risk of serious infections

Feb. 12, 2018—Opioid users have a significantly increased risk of infections severe enough to require treatment at the hospital, such as pneumonia and meningitis, as compared to people who don’t use opioids.

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Study evaluates community-based health efforts

Feb. 1, 2018—A new study from researchers at Vanderbilt and Harvard universities, published this week in the journal Health Affairs, uses federal health survey data to evaluate community-based efforts to address smoking, obesity and other health conditions such as type 2 diabetes and hypertension.

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Study shows gender identity plays key role in access to care

Dec. 14, 2017—A new large-scale study examining barriers to healthcare through the lens of gender identity finds that transgender men and women tend to fare poorly. The study, by researchers at Vanderbilt University and the University of Minnesota, appears in The Milbank Quarterly.

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