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Research

Cockroaches are morons in the morning and geniuses in the evening

Sep. 27, 2007—Dramatic daily variations in the cockroach's learning ability were discovered by a new study performed by Vanderbilt University biologists and published online this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Vanderbilt conference set on religion and the economy; ‘Focus on Poverty’ features three sessions Oct. 16-17

Sep. 27, 2007—The roles of government, the wealthy and God in combating poverty will be examined during the Conference on Religion and Economy: A Focus on Poverty at Vanderbilt University.

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Top 10 social skills students need to succeed

Sep. 27, 2007—Reading, writing, 'rithmetic and... good manners? Researchers have found that 10 basic social skills such as taking turns, listening and simply being nice are just as important to children's academic success as the subjects they study, and that students can and should be learning these skills in the classroom.

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Planning for & investing in every businesses’ most vital asset: Employees

Sep. 26, 2007—A new investment strategy helps a businesses' stock to skyrocket. A breakthrough product becomes a "must have." An innovative manufacturing technique saves a company time and money. What do these success stories all have in common? They were most likely created or implemented with the help of a team of talented and skilled employees.

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Vanderbilt professor testifies before Congress; Tracy Sharpley-Whiting speaks out about woman and popular culture

Sep. 25, 2007—A professor from Vanderbilt University told Congress on Tuesday that she found American culture "deeply gratifying and simultaneously disturbing" during a Washington hearing about stereotypes and degrading images in popular culture.

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New book explores effectiveness, challenges of charter schools

Sep. 24, 2007—As perhaps the fastest-growing sector in the school choice movement, charter schools claim to offer a bigger bang for the public education buck. The question is, is it true? According to Charter School Outcomes, a new book by some of the leading charter school researchers in the country, it depends.

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Adapting copyright laws to today’s dynamic digital age

Sep. 21, 2007—High tech trends like online music sharing, podcasting, blogging and streaming Internet video services seem to be evolving faster than you can click a mouse. But how are laws and business models changing to keep pace with these innovations?

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What chimpanzees can teach us about economics

Sep. 21, 2007—In a long standing enigma of economics and psychology, humans tend to immediately value an item they've just received more than the maximum amount they would have paid to get it to begin with. This tendency, known as endowment effect, is something some economists consider a fluke, but new research finds that humans aren't the only ones exhibiting an endowment effect.

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When proteins, antibodies and other biological molecules kiss, a new kind of biosensor can tell

Sep. 20, 2007—When biological molecules kiss, a new kind of biosensor can tell. A new and deceptively simple technique has been developed by chemists at Vanderbilt University that can measure the interactions between free-floating, unlabeled biological molecules including proteins, sugars, antibodies, DNA and RNA.

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Student study bolsters case for adding a rare sunflower to the endangered species list

Sep. 11, 2007—For several months last spring, the Vanderbilt greenhouse held more members of a rare species of native sunflower than are known to exist in the wild.

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Citing academic gains, researchers encourage testing educator performance pay

Sep. 4, 2007—New research from Vanderbilt University and the University of Missouri-Columbia suggests that performance pay for teachers and administrators often has a positive impact on student achievement and should be explored by states and school districts. Their findings are the result of a review of six large current or planned performance-pay programs and the U.S. Department of Education's $500 million Teacher Incentive Fund implemented under the federal No Child Left Behind Act.

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Advance in effort to fight malaria by tricking the mosquito’s sense of smell

Aug. 30, 2007—By mapping a specialized sensory organ that the malaria mosquito uses to zero in on its human prey, an international team of researchers has taken an important step toward developing new and improved repellants and attractants that can be used to reduce the threat of malaria, generally considered the most prevalent life-threatening disease in the world.

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