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Author: David Salisbury

Physics post-doc headed to Capitol Hill as congressional fellow

May. 18, 2012—Post-doctoral researcher Andrew Steigerwald has been selected by the Materials Research Society and the Minerals, Metals and Materials Society as their 2012-2013 Congressional Science and Engineering Fellow.

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‘Extractionator’ could bring cheap and effective malaria diagnostics to millions

May. 9, 2012—The "Extractionator" is a sophisticated little device that automates the diagnostic sample collection and preparation process so it can be operated by individuals in remote environments with minimal training.

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Quantum dots brighten the future of lighting

May. 8, 2012—Vanderbilt researchers have boosted the efficiency of a novel source of white light called quantum dots more than tenfold, making them of potential interest for commercial applications.

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Dopamine impacts your willingness to work

May. 1, 2012—A new brain imaging study that has found an individual’s willingness to work hard to earn money is strongly influenced by the chemistry in three specific areas of the brain.

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Rogue stars ejected from the galaxy found in intergalactic space

Apr. 30, 2012—Astronomers have identified nearly 700 rogue stars that appear to have been ejected from the Milky Way galaxy.

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Rep. Cooper launches “golden goose” award

Apr. 26, 2012—A new award, called the Golden Goose Award, has been established in order to highlight the often unexpected or serendipitous nature of basic scientific research by honoring federally funded researchers whose work may once have been viewed as unusual, odd or obscure but which has produced important discoveries that have benefited society in significant ways.

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Diversity aided mammals’ survival over deep time

Apr. 23, 2012—The first study of how mammals in North America adapted to climate change in “deep time” found that taxonomical families with greater diversity were more stable and maintained larger ranges than less diverse families.

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Crime and punishment: the neurobiological roots of modern justice

Apr. 18, 2012—Neuroscientists from Vanderbilt and Harvard have proposed the first neurobiological model for third-party punishment, outlining potential cognitive and brain processes that evolutionary pressures could have re-purposed to make this behavior possible.

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Seniors show off real-world design solutions at Senior Design Day

Apr. 13, 2012—Senior engineering students are challenged to solve real-world design issues for university and corporate sponsors during a two-semester design course. Students will share results with their clients and the Vanderbilt community at Senior Design Day, April 19, from 3-5 p.m. in Featheringill Hall.

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Breakdown of white-matter pathways affects decisionmaking as we age

Apr. 11, 2012—A brain-mapping study has found that people's ability to make decisions in novel situations decreases with age and is associated with a reduction in the integrity of two specific white-matter pathways.

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Beautiful minds: Sohee Park explores the schizophrenic brain

Mar. 29, 2012—Sohee Park's schizophrenia research may lead to a greater understanding of the benefit of movement therapies such as yoga and dance for the 2.2 million people in the United States who suffer from this mental disorder.

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Life without engineers

Mar. 23, 2012—In his talk titled “Engineering Excitement,” Norman Fortenberry, executive director of the American Association for Engineering Education outlined the changes in U.S. engineering education that he believes are necessary for the profession to adapt to the economic and social changes that are currently sweeping the globe.

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