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Author: David Salisbury

Public lecture on renaissance in Einstein’s theory of general relativity Oct. 22

Oct. 15, 2015—James Peebles, the Albert Einstein Professor of Science, Emeritus, at Princeton University, is giving a free public lecture on campus Oct. 22 titled "The Renaissance of General Relativity."

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Interpreting ambiguous visual information is surprisingly low level brain function

Oct. 7, 2015—When faced with ambiguous visual information, it is the visual processing areas of the brain that choose between the competing impressions, not the higher levels of the brain as previously thought.

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New faculty: Anna Marie Bohmann uses math to understand multidimensional spaces

Oct. 7, 2015—When Anna Marie Bohmann was growing up in Minneapolis, she enjoyed school in general—and math in particular—but had no idea that making a career in mathematics was even possible.

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Public lecture on next century in space Oct. 8

Oct. 5, 2015—Gregory Benford, a physicist at UC-Irvine and a noted science fiction author, is giving a free public lecture titled "Our Next Century in Space" that will describe steps that could see the opening of the solar system to productive use and colonization.

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World’s largest atom smashers create world’s smallest droplets

Oct. 2, 2015—Recent experiments at the world's largest atom smashers are producing liquid drops so small that they raise the question of how small a droplet can be and still remain a liquid.

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Scientific literature overstates psychotherapy’s effectiveness in treating depression

Sep. 30, 2015—New analysis shows that the scientific literature paints an overly rosy picture of the efficacy of psychotherapy for depression comparable to the bias previously found in reports of treatments with antidepressant drugs.

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First circularly polarized light detector on a silicon chip

Sep. 22, 2015—Invention of the first integrated circularly polarized light detector on a silicon chip opens the door for development of small, portable sensors that could expand the use of polarized light for drug screening, surveillance, etc.

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Bridge student part of team selected as finalist for R&D 100 Awards

Sep. 11, 2015—A doctoral student in the Fisk-Vanderbilt Master's-to-Ph.D. Bridge Program has helped develop a new kind of detector with potential applications in medical diagnostics and national security.

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Surgery and engineering initiative becomes institute

Sep. 10, 2015—VISE is keeping its acronym but changing its name. The Vanderbilt Initiative in Surgery and Engineering will become the Vanderbilt Institute in Surgery and Engineering.

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Evidence that Earth’s first mass extinction was caused by critters, not catastrophe

Sep. 2, 2015—The Earth's first mass extinction event 540 million years ago was caused not by a meteorite impact or volcanic super-eruption, but by the rise of early animals that dramatically changed to prehistoric environment.

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The pronoun ‘I’ is becoming obsolete

Aug. 19, 2015—Recent microbiological research has shown that plants and animals, including humans, are not autonomous individuals but are holobionts: biomolecular networks that consist of visible hosts plus millions of invisible microbes.

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Milky Way filled with wandering stars

Jul. 31, 2015—A new map of the Milky Way has discovered that 30 percent of the galaxy's stars are wanderers, making major shifts in their orbits during their lifetimes. Vanderbilt post-doc Jonathan Bird played a major role in the study.

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