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Author: Craig Boerner

Aliyu to receive preventive medicine ‘Rising Star’ award

Feb. 20, 2014—Muktar Aliyu, M.D., associate professor of Health Policy and Medicine, is receiving the William Kane Rising Star Award from the American College of Preventive Medicine (ACPM) at its annual banquet on Saturday in New Orleans.

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Red meat allergies likely result of lone star tick

Feb. 20, 2014—Tennessee, North Carolina and Virginia Seeing Numerous Cases Lone star tick bites are likely the cause of thousands of cases of severe red meat allergies that are plaguing patients in Southeastern states including Tennessee, North Carolina and Virginia and spreading up the Eastern Seaboard along with the deer population. Vanderbilt’s Asthma, Sinus and Allergy Program...

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Otolaryngology society lauds Wanna’s research efforts

Feb. 13, 2014—George Wanna, M.D., assistant professor of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, has been named to receive the Harris P. Mosher Award from the American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society Inc., also known as the Triological Society.

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Nutrition academy honors VUMC’s Killebrew, Robinson

Jan. 30, 2014—The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics is honoring Vanderbilt registered dietitians Dianne Killebrew, M.Ed., R.D., LDN, and Elizabeth Robinson, M.Ed., R.D., LDN, as Top Innovators in Dietetics Practice for their display entitled The GPS Strategy: A Tool Kit to Find Your Voice as a Leader.

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Rehab efforts help patient regain steps, golf stroke

Jan. 23, 2014—When Doug Reinhard arrived at Vanderbilt in September 2012 he was in a wheelchair, couldn’t feel his feet and definitely could not swing a golf club.

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Vanderbilt study reveals senses of sight and sound separated in children with autism

Jan. 14, 2014—Children with autism spectrum disorders have trouble integrating simultaneous information from their eyes and their ears--as if they experience the world like a badly-dubbed movie.

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Otolaryngology lands performance excellence award

Dec. 12, 2013—The Tennessee Center for Performance Excellence (TNCPE) is awarding Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center’s Department of Otolaryngology with its Commitment Award in the annual Excellence in Tennessee recognition program.

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Penicillin equally effective as ‘big gun’ antibiotics for treating less severe childhood pneumonia, Vanderbilt study shows

Dec. 9, 2013—Children hospitalized for pneumonia have similar outcomes, including length of stay and costs, regardless of whether they are treated with “big gun” antibiotics such as ceftriaxone or cefotaxime or more narrowly focused antibiotics such as ampicillin or penicillin.

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First-ever study uses EMRs to spot new disease associations

Dec. 5, 2013—Vanderbilt University Medical Center researchers and co-authors from four other U.S. institutions from the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) Network are repurposing genetic data and electronic medical records to perform the first large-scale phenome-wide association study (PheWAS), released today in Nature Biotechnology.

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Immunosuppressive drugs unlikely to raise fetal risk: study

Nov. 14, 2013—Women with chronic autoimmune diseases who take immunosuppressive medications during their first trimester of pregnancy are not putting their babies at significantly increased risk of adverse outcomes, according to a Vanderbilt study released online by the journal Arthritis and Rheumatism.

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Knowing who their physician is boosts patient satisfaction

Oct. 31, 2013—Knowing who your doctor is — and a couple of facts about that person — may go a long way toward improving patient satisfaction, according to a Vanderbilt study in the Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma.

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Study finds cognitive deficits common after critical illness

Oct. 3, 2013—Patients treated in intensive care units across the globe enter their medical care with no evidence of cognitive impairment but often leave with deficits similar to those seen in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) or mild Alzheimer’s disease (AD) that persist for at least a year, according to a Vanderbilt University Medical Center study published today in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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