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Author: Craig Boerner

Dmochowski receives lifetime achievement award from SUFU

Mar. 10, 2016—The Society for Urodynamics and Female Urology (SUFU), the premier specialty society for female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery, is awarding Vanderbilt’s Roger Dmochowski, M.D., professor of Urologic Surgery, with its SUFU Lifetime Achievement Award.

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School of Medicine’s Patel receives Presidential Early Career Award

Feb. 19, 2016—Vanderbilt University Medical Center’s Sachin Patel, associate professor of Psychiatry and of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, is one of 106 researchers named today by President Obama as a recipient of the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, the highest honor bestowed by the United States government on science and engineering professionals in the early stages of their independent research careers.

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Nashville Health Care Council selects VUMC’s Chang, Patel

Feb. 18, 2016—The Nashville Health Care Council is naming Vanderbilt’s Sam Chang, M.D., MBA, professor of Urologic Surgery and Oncology, and Neal Patel, M.D., professor of Clinical Pediatrics, to its 2016 Council Fellows class, selected by the Council Fellows Advisory Committee led by former U.S. Sen. Majority Leader Bill Frist, M.D.

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Schaffner honored by Houston Academy of Medicine

Jan. 28, 2016—The Houston Academy of Medicine and Harris County Medical Society awarded William Schaffner, M.D., professor of Preventive Medicine, with the 2016 John P. McGovern Compleat Physician Award last week.

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Society of Urologic Oncology honors VUMC’s Smith

Dec. 10, 2015—The Society of Urologic Oncology (SUO) is recognizing Joseph Smith Jr., M.D., professor of Urologic Surgery, with the Huggins Medal, its highest honor, for his lifetime contributions to the progress in treatment for patients with genitourinary neoplasms, which are tumors or cancer of the reproductive organs and the urinary system.

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Schaffner honored for public health contributions

Nov. 12, 2015—William Schaffner, M.D., professor of Preventive Medicine, is this year’s recipient of the American Public Health Association’s (APHA) 2015 John Snow Award, a longstanding award given in recognition of “enduring contributions to public health through epidemiologic methods and practice.”

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Reduced-nicotine cigarettes decreased dependence and frequency of smoking: NEJM study

Sep. 30, 2015—Reduced-nicotine cigarettes were beneficial in reducing nicotine exposure and dependence, and also the number of cigarettes smoked per day, when compared with standard-nicotine cigarettes in a six-week study published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Theatre program benefits children with autism: study

Sep. 30, 2015—Children with autism who participated in a 10-week, 40-hour, theatre-based program showed significant differences in social ability compared to a group of children with autism who did not participate, according to a Vanderbilt study published in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders.

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VUMC pulmonary team launches study of rare lung disease

Aug. 13, 2015—Vanderbilt University Medical Center is launching a research study for a rare disease called Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome (HPS), an inherited disorder that causes albinism, decreased visual acuity and susceptibility to bleeding due to platelet dysfunction.

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Study tracks postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome

Aug. 6, 2015—Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) and Dysautonomia International are partnering to launch the first large international study on postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS), which impacts an estimated 500,000 to 3 million patients in the United States and millions more around the globe.

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Study highlights pneumonia hospitalizations among U.S. adults

Jul. 15, 2015—Viruses, not bacteria, are the most commonly detected respiratory pathogens in U.S. adults hospitalized with pneumonia, according to a New England Journal of Medicine study released today and conducted by researchers at Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and hospitals in Chicago and Nashville, including Vanderbilt University Medical Center.

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Healthy diet linked to lower death rates among low-income residents in Southeastern U.S.

Jun. 29, 2015—A low-fat diet rich in plants, whole grains and seafood, and low in red and processed meats, sweets and sugary drinks was linked with a lower risk of dying from heart disease, stroke, cancer or other diseases among a population of low-income, mostly African American individuals living in the Southeast.

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