Skip to Content

Research News at Vanderbilt

Vanderbilt leads international effort to develop universal flu vaccine

|

Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center are leading an international effort to develop a universal influenza vaccine that would protect everyone against all strains of the flu anywhere in the world.

Current flu vaccines can reduce the risk of influenza by up to 60 percent during seasons when the vaccine is well-matched to most circulating strains of the flu. In some years, however, vaccine effectiveness has dropped to 10 percent, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

With influenza killing 250,000 to 500,000 people around the world each year, “we are long overdue to solve this very real global health threat,” said Wayne Koff, Ph.D., President and CEO of The Human Vaccines Project, a public-private partnership that is funding the effort.

The Universal Influenza Vaccine Initiative, which was announced today, will be led by James Crowe Jr., M.D., director of the Vanderbilt Vaccine Center, and C. Buddy Creech, M.D., MPH, associate professor of Pediatrics and director of the Vanderbilt Vaccine Research Program in the Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases.

The initiative will launch a series of influenza vaccine clinical trials in globally diverse populations beginning early in 2018.

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, J. Craig Venter Institute, the University of British Columbia and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory will conduct a broad spectrum analysis of blood and tissue samples from vaccinated and infected individuals.

Coupled with artificial intelligence driven computer simulation models, they will seek to determine why some people are protected against the flu while others are not.

“These trials will be among the most comprehensive human clinical research studies ever undertaken,” said Crowe, the Ann Scott Carell Professor in the Departments of Pediatrics and Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology.

“They will determine how the immune system protects against different strains of influenza in different populations and geographic regions of the world, and what is required for a vaccine to generate long-term protective immunity,” he said in a prepared statement.

“Until now, we have lacked the biomedical and computational tools to probe the complex and dynamic features of the human immune system in a complete way,” Crowe added.

“But with today’s technology, we can decipher the core principles behind how the immune system protects vulnerable populations, and develop a full understanding of how it prevents and controls influenza to inform the development of a universally effective vaccine.”

Media Inquiries:
Bill Snyder, (615) 322-4747
william.snyder@Vanderbilt.Edu