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VUToday: Comic-book time travel in weekly roundup of VU news stories

by | Mar. 17, 2017, 5:40 PM

University News and Communications publishes VUToday, a compilation of Vanderbilt mentions in the media, each weekday. Read a selection of Vanderbilt news stories for the week of March 13. To subscribe to the daily VUToday newsletter, visit news.vanderbilt.edu/vutoday.

Inverse: Superhero plan to time travel in Large Hadron Collider isn’t sci-fi

In the latest issue of a comic book series, the superheroes gather to discuss how to use the Large Hadron Collider to jump across universes. While the thought of using the world’s largest and most powerful particle accelerator seems to be purely fictional, the heroes aren’t the first to propose it. In the comic, a scientist explains the theory; however, a real-life scientist dreamed it up first. A 2011 paper by Vanderbilt University Professor of Physics Tom Weiler, which introduces the time-travel theory as a byproduct of the LHC, is referenced. Weiler is quoted.

The Tennessee Tribune: Video: Take 10 featuring Vanderbilt Chancellor Nicholas S. Zeppos, part 1

Tennessee Tribune Editorial Director Sandra Long Weaver talks with Chancellor Nicholas S. Zeppos about Opportunity Vanderbilt, improving diversity efforts on campus and other highlights and issues that have occurred during the chancellor’s nearly 10 years leading Vanderbilt.

The Tennessee Tribune: Video: Take 10 featuring Vanderbilt Chancellor Nicholas S. Zeppos, part 2

Tennessee Tribune Editorial Director Sandra Long Weaver talks with Chancellor Nicholas S. Zeppos about issues that have occurred during his nearly 10 years leading Vanderbilt, which include his initiative to improve diversity efforts on and off campus, the success of the Fisk–Vanderbilt Master’s-to-Ph.D. Bridge program, and the creation of the Office of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion.

The New York Times: A Brooklyn charter school looks past ‘no excuses’

Despite a culture that emphasized aspiration, opportunities for failure abounded in a Brooklyn, New York, charter school that held to a “no excuses” philosophy—the notion that poor children are best taught in highly regulated environments. Borrowing from an alternative program, the school began to retrain teachers to focus on providing social and emotional development frameworks for students. A study by Joanne W. Golann, assistant professor of public policy and education, which argued against “no excuses” schools, is referenced.

The Christian Science Monitor: Civil engineers give America’s infrastructure a D+. Is that credible?

The American Society of Civil Engineers has just confirmed what residents of Flint, Michigan, and Oroville, California, already know too well: America’s infrastructure is in bad shape. On Thursday the ASCE released its 2017 Infrastructure Report Card, giving a D+ to the physical systems that keep America running. Janey Camp, research associate professor of civil and environmental engineering, is quoted.

Travel & Leisure: The best college dining halls in America

Vanderbilt Campus Dining is featured in this list of the best college dining in the U.S., based on quality, variety and food practices.

Media Inquiries:
Seth Robertson, (615) 322-NEWS
seth.robertson@Vanderbilt.Edu