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Celebrate the 100th anniversary of the Theory of Relativity at Dyer April 8

by Apr. 1, 2015, 1:43 PM

Photo of relativity equation
(iStock)

When NASA astronaut Scott Kelly completes his yearlong mission on the International Space Station next year, he’ll come back just a little bit younger than his twin, Mark, than he was before. This is because time travels more slowly in space—a phenomenon first described by Einstein’s 1915 revolutionary theory of general relativity.

To celebrate the 100th anniversary of the theory’s publication, Dyer Observatory will host a talk by What is Relativity? author Jeffrey Bennett Wednesday, April 8, at 7 p.m.

Bennett will introduce the concept of relativity and describe how it affects all kinds of technology we use today, why we don’t age as quickly in space and what it would be like to travel through a black hole. His talk is geared for both kids and adults.

Bennett will also visit Vanderbilt’s campus twice. On Wednesday, April 8, at 4 p.m., he will give a presentation on strategies for teaching science at Room 223 of the Wyatt Center. This event is hosted by the Department of Teaching and Learning.

On Thursday, April 9, Bennett will speak at a colloquium hosted by the Department of Physics and Astronomy in Stevenson 4327. His talk is geared to a general audience. (Information and directions here.)

portrait
Jeffrey Bennett (Courtesy of the author)

Bennett, an astronomer and educator, is the winner of the 2013 American Institute of Physics Science Communication Award. He has a Ph.D. in astrophysics from the University of Colorado at Boulder and is the lead author of textbooks and popular science books for the general public and children. His children’s books are currently aboard the International Space Station, where astronauts are reading them to children on Earth through the outreach organization Story Time From Space.

Weather permitting, visitors may observe through Dyer’s Seyfert Telescope after the talk.

This is a ticketed event. Tickets are $5 and may be purchased online here.

Dyer Observatory is located at 1000 Oman Drive in Brentwood. Directions are available here.

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