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Public lecture series at Vanderbilt features renowned Civil War scholars

by | Posted on Thursday, Jan. 20, 2011 — 12:02 PM

(Courtesy of The Harris D. Riley Collection, Vanderbilt Special Collections and University Archives.)

U.S. Civil War scholars from across the nation will speak at Vanderbilt University this spring on a variety of themes, including the war’s impact on Nashville, during a series of public lectures.

The talks, sponsored by the university’s College of Arts and Science, take place during the 150th anniversary of the start of the Civil War and the presidential inauguration of Abraham Lincoln. The lectures are in conjunction with an interdisciplinary undergraduate course on the Civil War co-taught by Richard Blackett, the Andrew Jackson Professor of History, and Michael Kreyling, the Gertrude Conway Vanderbilt Professor of English.

All of the lectures, which are free and open to the public, will begin at 4:10 p.m.

  • Jan. 27 South Carolina State University History Professor Stanley Harrold addresses “Abolitionism and the Coming of the Civil War.” Harrold has done extensive research on the complex dynamics leading to the Civil War and recently wrote Border States. Video of Harrold’s talk will be available a few days after the lecture at Vanderbilt News.
  • Feb. 8 Joseph Glatthaar, the Stephenson Distinguished Professor of History at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, discusses “Why the Confederacy Lost: The Experiences of Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia.” Glatthaar teaches about the Civil War and is the author of General Lee’s Army: From Victory to Defeat.
  • Feb. 17 George Rable, professor and Charles G. Summersell Chair in Southern History at the University of Alabama, lectures on “The Civil War as a Political Crisis.” His books include Fredericksburg! Fredericksburg! and The Confederate Republic: A Revolution against Politics. He serves as president of the Society of Civil War Historians.
  • Feb. 24 Thavolia Glymph, associate professor of history at Duke University, will speak on “Disappeared Without Any Account Being Had of Them: Enslaved Women and the Armies of the Civil War.” Glymph has written extensively on Southern women and slavery. Out of the House of Bondage: The Transformation of the Plantation Household is her most recent book.
  • March 17 Stephanie McCurry, professor of history at the University of Pennsylvania, will address “Antigone’s Claim: Gender and Treason in the American Civil War.” McCurry’s areas of expertise include the American South and the Civil War era, and the history of women and gender.
  • March 24 David Blight, professor of American history and director of the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance and Abolition at Yale University, will deliver the Harry C. Howard Jr. Lecture. His talk is titled “Gods and Devils Aplenty: Robert Penn Warren’s Civil War.” Blight recently authored A Slave No More: Two Men Who Escaped to Freedom, Including Their Narratives of Emancipation. His current book project is on the U.S. Civil War sesquicentennial related to Robert Penn Warren’s The Legacy of the Civil War. This lecture is sponsored by the Robert Penn Warren Center for the Humanities. Note: This lecture will take place in the Community Room of the Main Library.
  • April 7 Bobby Lovett, professor of history at Tennessee State University, will lecture on “Nashville and the Civil War, 1860-1866, and the Economic, Social and Political Transformations.” Lovett’s areas of expertise include African-American history and Tennessee as well as Nashville history. His books include The African American History of Nashville, 1780-1930: Elites and Dilemmas and The Civil Rights Movement in Tennessee: a Narrative History.
  • April 21 Stephen Ash, professor of history at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, will speak on “William G. Brownlow, Saint of Sinner? A Fresh Look at one of Tennessee’s Most Controversial Civil War Figures.” His books include The Black Experience in the Civil War South and Firebrand of Liberty: The Story of Two Black Regiments That Changed the Course of the Civil War. Ash’s research primarily focuses on the U.S. Civil War and Reconstruction, Southern history and Tennessee history.

All of the lectures will take place in Buttrick Hall, Room 101, with the exception of David Blight’s talk, which will take place in the Community Room of the Main Library.

For more information on the Civil War lecture series, call 615-322-2575 or email history@vanderbilt.edu.

U.S. Civil War scholars from across the nation will speak at Vanderbilt University this spring on a variety of themes, including the war’s impact on Nashville, during a series of public lectures.

The talks, sponsored by the university’s College of Arts and Science, take place during the 150th anniversary of the start of the Civil War and the presidential inauguration of Abraham Lincoln. The lectures are in conjunction with an interdisciplinary undergraduate course on the Civil War co-taught by Richard Blackett, the Andrew Jackson Professor of History, and Michael Kreyling, the Gertrude Conway Vanderbilt Professor of English.

All of the lectures, which are free and open to the public, will begin at 4:10 p.m.

· Jan. 27 South Carolina State University History Professor Stanley Harrold addresses “Abolitionism and the Coming of the Civil War.” Harrold has done extensive research on the complex dynamics leading to the Civil War and recently wrote Border States. Video of Harrold’s talk will be available a few days after the lecture at http://news.vanderbilt.edu.

· Feb. 8 Joseph Glatthaar, the Stephenson Distinguished Professor of History at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, discusses “Why the Confederacy Lost: The Experiences of Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia.” Glatthaar teaches about the Civil War and is the author of General Lee’s Army: From Victory to Defeat.

· Feb. 17 George Rable, professor and Charles G. Summersell Chair in Southern History at the University of Alabama, lectures on “The Civil War as a Political Crisis.” His books include Fredericksburg! Fredericksburg! and The Confederate Republic: A Revolution against Politics. He serves as president of the Society of Civil War Historians.

· Feb. 24 Thavolia Glymph, associate professor of history at Duke University, will speak on “Disappeared Without Any Account Being Had of Them: Enslaved Women and the Armies of the Civil War.” Glymph has written extensively on Southern women and slavery. Out of the House of Bondage: The Transformation of the Plantation Household is her most recent book.

· March 17 Stephanie McCurry, professor of history at the University of Pennsylvania, will address “Antigone’s Claim: Gender and Treason in the American Civil War.” McCurry’s areas of expertise include the American South and the Civil War era, and the history of women and gender.

· March 24 David Blight, professor of American history and director of the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance and Abolition at Yale University, will deliver the Harry C. Howard Jr. Lecture. His talk is titled “Gods and Devils Aplenty: Robert Penn Warren’s Civil War.” Blight recently authored A Slave No More: Two Men Who Escaped to Freedom, Including Their Narratives of Emancipation. His current book project is on the U.S. Civil War sesquicentennial related to Robert Penn Warren’s The Legacy of the Civil War. This lecture is sponsored by the Robert Penn Warren Center for the Humanities.

· April 7 Bobby Lovett, professor of history at Tennessee State University, will lecture on “Nashville and the Civil War, 1860-1866, and the Economic, Social and Political Transformations.” Lovett’s areas of expertise include African-American history and Tennessee as well as Nashville history. His books include The African American History of Nashville, 1780-1930: Elites and Dilemmas and The Civil Rights Movement in Tennessee: a Narrative History.

· April 21 Stephen Ash, professor of history at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, will speak on “William G. Brownlow, Saint of Sinner? A Fresh Look at one of Tennessee’s Most Controversial Civil War Figures.” His books include The Black Experience in the Civil War South and Firebrand of Liberty: The Story of Two Black Regiments That Changed the Course of the Civil War. Ash’s research primarily focuses on the U.S. Civil War and Reconstruction, Southern history and Tennessee history.

All of the lectures will take place in Buttrick Hall, Room 101, with the exception of David Blight’s talk. The room for that lecture will be announced later at http://www.vanderbilt.edu/rpw_center.

For more information on the Civil War lecture series, call 615-322-2575 or email history@vanderbilt.edu.

Contact:
Ann Marie Deer Owens, (615) 322-NEWS
annmarie.owens@vanderbilt.edu


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